Thought Provoking Graphs

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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Pyrrho » Fri Aug 31, 2018 3:51 pm

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The flash of light you saw in the sky was not a UFO. Swamp gas from a weather balloon was trapped in a thermal pocket and reflected the light from Venus.

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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Witness » Sat Sep 01, 2018 3:45 am

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Distance between highest and lowest points in each US state
Does Florida come to the surface only at low tide? :twisted:

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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Pyrrho » Sat Sep 01, 2018 11:42 am

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The flash of light you saw in the sky was not a UFO. Swamp gas from a weather balloon was trapped in a thermal pocket and reflected the light from Venus.

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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by ed » Sat Sep 01, 2018 12:13 pm

Witness wrote:
Sat Sep 01, 2018 3:45 am
Image
Distance between highest and lowest points in each US state
Does Florida come to the surface only at low tide? :twisted:
That is why my posting is only at certain times of the day. :(
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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by sparks » Sat Sep 01, 2018 5:40 pm

Scuba gear to ed ... STAT!
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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Witness » Sun Sep 02, 2018 2:34 am


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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Pyrrho » Mon Sep 03, 2018 12:35 am

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The flash of light you saw in the sky was not a UFO. Swamp gas from a weather balloon was trapped in a thermal pocket and reflected the light from Venus.

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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Witness » Mon Sep 03, 2018 1:46 am

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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Anaxagoras » Mon Sep 03, 2018 4:01 am

Doctor X wrote:
Fri Aug 31, 2018 7:44 am
I know countless of English speaker who try or have to speak Japanese at varying levels of incompetence. I have yet to meet anyone I would consider fluent, but that is really impossible for most beyond the age of 9ish-13ish when your parietotemporal cortices thingies all calcify and you are stuck thinking 80's music is "da bomb." Why it is so hard for young adults to us to speak without accents.
I've been living in Japan for almost 20 years now (more if you count my tour in the Navy back in the 90s and my "year abroad" studying at Sophia), and I know that I will never be nearly as "fluent" in the language as a native speaker. I have a more limited vocabulary and I don't "hear" the language in the same way that a native speaker hears it (except for some basic level stuff that is now practically natural for me). Part of the reason may be that, because of modern technology and such, I am not totally "immersed" even here, although I usually have opportunities to speak Japanese every day. Although when I talk to a Japanese person for the first time, they inevitably compliment me on my Japanese, part of that is just being polite. I still often cannot follow what a person said and have to stop them to explain that I didn't understand something. It makes for a lousy conversation when one person cannot follow what the other is saying. Sometimes it's not too bad. Other times it can get painful, especially if I still fail to understand even after they repeat or rephrase what they just said. Sometimes, as long as I can get the general point of what they are saying, I'll just ignore the other parts and respond to the part that I understood. Because it's awkward to tell someone that you didn't understand what they said.
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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Doctor X » Mon Sep 03, 2018 5:54 am

Which sort of explains the blank stares I get from Japanese when I try to speak Japanese or English to them!

But, yeah, one tries to get the "gist" of what is being said.

As for "not hearing" that is an actual neurophysiological problem: we ["We?"--Ed.] lose the ability to hear some things that The Children have no problem hearing. With training, I suppose, you can compensate. The comedian I gave as an example some time ago in the Japan thread explains that, to the Japanese, "kowaii" and "kawaii" sound completely different like "rice" and "mice" sound different to an English speaker. They are not "puns" at all, nor would a Japanese person mistake them any more than you would ask for "a bowl of mice." I thought "hospital" and "beauty parlor" were even closer which leads to the 冗談ね of being emergently taken to a "beauty parlor."

When I mentioned this to a few Okinawans, they would stare, think about it, and respond, politely, "oh yeah, I guess I could see that." I can now "hear the difference" but I doubt I could if a native speaker says either word in a conversation at normal speed rather than I . . . am . . . learning . . . to . . . speak speed.

Gram's Mom could tell you about some wonderful consonants Russky has which Freedom does not. Similar are Semitic languages, which include Hebrew and Arabic, which have the ḥ [Phlegm--Ed.] sound that Japanese certainly does not have. You cannot even transliterate it into Japanese. Granted, you cannot in English either; someone has to cough the consonant ḥ at you so you know what it sounds like.

Have you learned how to say the "r" of Japanese correctly? I got a table of semi-drunk students to learn how to "roll" them for a bit: "It's entirrrrrely prrrrrivate!"

Funny, today I listened to an explanation that the "ga" [が--Ed.] particle and consonant-vowel pair--there must be a term for that I have forgotten!--use to have a far more nasal sound. Sort of a "nga" but not the same as in words where "n" [ん--Ed.] appears before it. This is the older sound that older people may still use, it was explained. I now know why in older tapes of conversations, it seemed to sound like sometimes someone was almost but not quite saying, "aringatō."

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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Anaxagoras » Mon Sep 03, 2018 8:18 am

Doctor X wrote:
Mon Sep 03, 2018 5:54 am
As for "not hearing" that is an actual neurophysiological problem: we ["We?"--Ed.] lose the ability to hear some things that The Children have no problem hearing. With training, I suppose, you can compensate. The comedian I gave as an example some time ago in the Japan thread explains that, to the Japanese, "kowaii" and "kawaii" sound completely different like "rice" and "mice" sound different to an English speaker. They are not "puns" at all, nor would a Japanese person mistake them any more than you would ask for "a bowl of mice." I thought "hospital" and "beauty parlor" were even closer which leads to the 冗談ね of being emergently taken to a "beauty parlor."
Yeah, I think I've pretty much got those distinctions down, although they confused me too in the beginning.

"kowai" (note, only one "i", which is important) can be distinguished from "kawaii" either from which syllable the emphasis comes on or by paying more attention to the vowel sounds. It's "Ka-wai-iiiiiii!!!!" ;) which is to say don't just pronounce those two i's as one vowel sound, the last one should be its own syllable. It's important in Japanese to pronounce the vowels correctly, whereas in English vowels have a tendency to sort of morph into an "uh" or an "eh" and it's sort of rare for one vowel sound to be followed by another (such as coöperation or naïve, as it would be spelled in the New Yorker). My Japanese teacher once taught me a whole Japanese sentence composed entirely of vowels: ああいう青い家を負おう (it's a nonsense sentence meaning something like "Let's carry a blue house like that one" but it is grammatically correct and contains nary a consonant.

Gram's Mom could tell you about some wonderful consonants Russky has which Freedom does not. Similar are Semitic languages, which include Hebrew and Arabic, which have the ḥ [Phlegm--Ed.] sound that Japanese certainly does not have. You cannot even transliterate it into Japanese. Granted, you cannot in English either; someone has to cough the consonant ḥ at you so you know what it sounds like.
I have heard that sound although I probably can't produce it without hacking up a loogie. Isn't that why there's two different ways to spell "Hanukkah" in English? The "Chanukah" spelling sort of gets at the fact that it isn't quite an "H" although it isn't really like we pronounce "Ch" either.
Have you learned how to say the "r" of Japanese correctly?
Yes, that is one thing I can do pretty well. It's much easier for us to learn that (in my opinion), than it is for Japanese to learn our R's and L's.

Funny, today I listened to an explanation that the "ga" [が--Ed.] particle and consonant-vowel pair--there must be a term for that I have forgotten!--use to have a far more nasal sound. Sort of a "nga" but not the same as in words where "n" [ん--Ed.] appears before it. This is the older sound that older people may still use, it was explained. I now know why in older tapes of conversations, it seemed to sound like sometimes someone was almost but not quite saying, "aringatō."

--J.D.
Yeah, I think I know what you mean. Japanese too changes over time.
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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Doctor X » Mon Sep 03, 2018 9:07 am

Anaxagoras wrote:
Mon Sep 03, 2018 8:18 am
"kowai" (note, only one "i", which is important)
Image
It's "Ka-wai-iiiiiii!!!!" ;)
Indeed, and some even contract it to: かぁいい with a small あ just to emphasize that!
It's important in Japanese to pronounce the vowels correctly, whereas in English vowels have a tendency to sort of morph into an "uh" or an "eh" and it's sort of rare for one vowel sound to be followed by another (such as coöperation or naïve, as it would be spelled in the New Yorker).
Two odd problems. First, technically, save for something like "Ji" + "u" to give "Jyu" there are no diphthongs. 前 [Mae--Ed.] is "Mă-ĕ" and not "My" or "May." This is why I do not like the modern Romaji transliteration that renders a lengthened vowel with "u" for う which does not appear in the kanji because the natural pronunciation of, say, "ou" is "oo" as in "soup." Hilariously, Rosetta Stone will pronounce it that way!

Second, there does not seem to be as you suggest a sort of natural vowel "drift" that you see in English. Maybe in regional pronunciations--who knows what the Fags in Osaka say these days!--but in English, the vowels vary greatly. "Kowaii" is going to have a long "o" and not become a short "kuhwhy." English will do this, hence "kuhwaii" which sounds like "kawaii[i--Ed.]."

This is something I have to yell at students all of the time, though I confess creating the same horrible mispronunciations. I am just happy that, thus far, I have not told someone to "get fucked by Gram's Mom!" Funnily enough, I patiently listened to a 外人様 who pontificated upon his knowledge of all things Japanese since, as a kid, he lived in a city that apparently had a few. Anyways, he went on and on how to pronounce something which was similar to me saying you should always address "Waifu-sama" as "OX-san." This was one of the few times I patiently ignored him. When he tried to correct me in public, I simply continued to pronounce the words he did not understand properly.

How did I know? Because a 沖縄人 was sick of how I mispronounced them and corrected me specifically. But you "can't help fools!"

Anyways, you really want to drive the 奥様日本人 crazy ask them when to pronounce "the" as "thē" or "thuh."

Think about it. We all understand the difference. Very hard to explain.
My Japanese teacher once taught me a whole Japanese sentence composed entirely of vowels: ああいう青い家を負おう (it's a nonsense sentence meaning something like "Let's carry a blue house like that one" but it is grammatically correct and contains nary a consonant.
:D
I have heard that sound although I probably can't produce it without hacking up a loogie. Isn't that why there's two different ways to spell "Hanukkah" in English? The "Chanukah" spelling sort of gets at the fact that it isn't quite an "H" although it isn't really like we pronounce "Ch" either.
Worse. The "H" is the "phlegm" ḥ I mentioned. Outside of academia, no one knows what it means so people fudges. The "ch" creates problems because people either think it is like "ch" sound from "check": "chonika! Mazeltof!" or the "ch" of "loch" which is some sort of different mess which will summon Elder Gods. The "double k" is because it is doubled in that situation. Funny, the Wiki transliteration is wrong by using "KH" for ḥ which results in a different sound. That is usually used for an alteration of the "k" [כ--Ed.] . . . or maybe "unalteration" since without the daglesh [・--Ed.] that is its pronunciation which is a "K" sound with phlegm!
Have you learned how to say the "r" of Japanese correctly?
Yes, that is one thing I can do pretty well. It's much easier for us to learn that (in my opinion), than it is for Japanese to learn our R's and L's.
See, I have no idea if I am doing it correctly. Granted, I try not to "roll" them, but there are a few words, like the Japanese "dollars" where I almost do it just to piss them off! I come from a region where "r" is optional unless it is unnecessary, in which case, it becomes mandatory . . . like Your Motha has idears."
Yeah, I think I know what you mean. Japanese too changes over time.
All languages do no matter how much we fight. I do not know if part of that is familiarity with English where "g" rarely has that "nasal" quality on its own. If you want it in English, you add an "n" before it. Anyways, the "hard g" has become the default for が.

I have had fun with づ. Hearing the difference between "tsu" and "zu" is very hard for English speakers. Just ask Gram's Mom about the pronunciation of "Tsar." Fortunately, I had a relative pound that into me since the "ts" sound is elemental to Slavic languages. Funny that it is also in Hebrew and Japanese. Anyways, just as K☞G sometimes in combinations, so does つ☞づ in combinations such as:
小拳突き is actually shōken zuki but it is near impossible for "us" to hear the difference between "ts" and "z." However, in publications, the furigana confirms the づ. Though I have had some claim it is "du" because those are the characters you type to create づ. Which makes it t3h D34dly shōken dookie!!!!11!
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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Witness » Tue Sep 04, 2018 12:41 am

A century of trends in adult human height

Abstract

Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3–19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8–144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries.
Image

More graphs: https://elifesciences.org/articles/1341 ... y-material

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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Grammatron » Tue Sep 04, 2018 10:52 pm

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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Abdul Alhazred » Tue Sep 04, 2018 11:34 pm

Did vodka suddenly become more expensive with the fall of the Soviet Union?
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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Witness » Tue Sep 11, 2018 2:29 am

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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Anaxagoras » Wed Sep 12, 2018 4:55 am

Not a graph but a funny thing about polls:

Taco Bell voted best Mexican restaurant in the country

It makes some sense if you think about it. I don't mean that Taco Bell really is the best Mexican restaurant in the country, only that taking a poll of randomly selected people is a terrible way to figure out what the best Mexican restaurant is. The result only reflects the one that everyone can name off the top of their head.
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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Abdul Alhazred » Wed Sep 12, 2018 9:30 am

Anaxagoras wrote:
Wed Sep 12, 2018 4:55 am
Not a graph but a funny thing about polls:

Taco Bell voted best Mexican restaurant in the country

It makes some sense if you think about it. I don't mean that Taco Bell really is the best Mexican restaurant in the country, only that taking a poll of randomly selected people is a terrible way to figure out what the best Mexican restaurant is. The result only reflects the one that everyone can name off the top of their head.
Is there any decent Mexican restaurant that everyone in the country has heard of? Could there be?

The real stat is Taco Bell versus anything else.
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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Grammatron » Wed Sep 12, 2018 5:32 pm

Anaxagoras wrote:
Wed Sep 12, 2018 4:55 am
Not a graph but a funny thing about polls:

Taco Bell voted best Mexican restaurant in the country

It makes some sense if you think about it. I don't mean that Taco Bell really is the best Mexican restaurant in the country, only that taking a poll of randomly selected people is a terrible way to figure out what the best Mexican restaurant is. The result only reflects the one that everyone can name off the top of their head.
It reads more like a brand awareness poll than anything.

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Re: Thought Provoking Graphs

Post by Witness » Thu Sep 13, 2018 4:12 am