Cool astronomy photos

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Anaxagoras » Tue Oct 24, 2017 11:38 am

Not photos, but an interview with Kim Stanley Robinson, science fiction author about Mars colonization and other topics.

https://www.marketplace.org/2017/10/24/ ... y-robinson
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Abdul Alhazred » Tue Oct 24, 2017 12:31 pm

Image

Explanation at link:
Where Your Elements Came From (NASA)
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby sparks » Wed Oct 25, 2017 1:20 pm

"Nucleosynthesis is our friend!"
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Sat Oct 28, 2017 3:11 am

Image

M 63

Hubble’s Messier Catalog

Although there are as many as one hundred billion comets in the outer regions of the solar system, prior to 1995, only around 900 had ever been discovered. This is because most comets are too dim to be detected without the proper astronomical equipment. Occasionally, however, a comet will sweep past the sun that is bright enough to be seen during the daytime with the naked eye.

One such instance occurred in 1744. Comet Klinkenberg-Chéseaux, discovered by three amateur astronomers in late 1743, grew steadily brighter as it approached the sun. By the end of February 1744, the comet had reached its peak brightness at an apparent magnitude of –7, making it the brightest object in the sky except for the sun and moon. The comet’s brilliance captured the interest of professional and amateur astronomers alike, including a young Charles Messier.

Born in 1730 in Badonviller, France, Messier had to give up formal education at age 11 when his father died. Soon after, he witnessed the spectacular Comet Klinkenberg-Chéseaux, which ignited his passion for astronomy. At the age of 21, Messier was hired as a draftsman for the French navy. He learned to use astronomical tools and became a skilled observer. For his efforts, Messier was eventually promoted to the chief astronomer of the Marine Observatory in Paris, where he pursued his interest in comets. He discovered over a dozen comets, earning him the nickname “Comet Ferret” from King Louis XV.

In 1758, Messier was in the process of observing one such comet when he was distracted by a cloudy object in the constellation Taurus. Upon further observation, he realized that the object could not be a comet because it was not moving across the sky. In an effort to prevent other astronomers from mistaking the object for a comet, Messier took note of it and began to catalog other comet-like “objects to avoid.”


The catalog: https://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/hubble-s-messier-catalog

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Anaxagoras » Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:19 am

A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Anaxagoras » Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:25 am

Abdul Alhazred wrote:Image

Explanation at link:
Where Your Elements Came From (NASA)



The ones like Tc (technetium) for which there is no explanation on the legend are those with no stable isotopes. They do get produced by things like supernovae or inside stars, but they decay within a few million years or sooner for some elements, so they don't stick around for very long.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isotopes_of_technetium
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Tue Oct 31, 2017 2:40 am

Our neighbor:

Image
M31: The Andromeda Galaxy
Image Credit & Copyright: Jacob Bers (Bersonic)

Explanation: Andromeda is the nearest major galaxy to our own Milky Way Galaxy. Our Galaxy is thought to look much like Andromeda. Together these two galaxies dominate the Local Group of galaxies. The diffuse light from Andromeda is caused by the hundreds of billions of stars that compose it. The several distinct stars that surround Andromeda's image are actually stars in our Galaxy that are well in front of the background object. Andromeda is frequently referred to as M31 since it is the 31st object on Messier's list of diffuse sky objects. M31 is so distant it takes about two million years for light to reach us from there. Although visible without aid, the above image of M31 was taken with a standard camera through a small telescope. Much about M31 remains unknown, including how it acquired its unusual double-peaked center.

From NASA's APOD, taken by an amateur from reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/astrophotography/comments/2c4ukh/my_picture_of_m31_is_todays_apod_astronomy/
:shock:

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby sparks » Tue Oct 31, 2017 6:39 am



Our pissed-off Sun!
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Wed Nov 01, 2017 4:30 am

↑ Cosmic pumpkin. :mrgreen:

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Fri Nov 03, 2017 11:35 pm

Image
NASA wrote:Hubble Sees Nearby Asteroids Photobombing Distant Galaxies

This Hubble photo of a random patch of sky is part of a survey called Frontier Fields. The colorful image contains thousands of galaxies, including massive yellowish ellipticals and majestic blue spirals. Much smaller, fragmentary blue galaxies are sprinkled throughout the field. The reddest objects are most likely the farthest galaxies, whose light has been stretched into the red part of the spectrum by the expansion of space.

Intruding across the picture are asteroid trails that appear as curved or S-shaped streaks. Rather than leaving one long trail, the asteroids appear in multiple Hubble exposures that have been combined into one image. Of the 20 total asteroid sightings for this field, seven are unique objects. Of these seven asteroids, only two were earlier identified. The others were too faint to be seen previously.

The trails look curved due to an observational effect called parallax. As Hubble orbits around Earth, an asteroid will appear to move along an arc with respect to the vastly more distant background stars and galaxies.
[…]
All the asteroids were found manually, the majority by "blinking" consecutive exposures to capture apparent asteroid motion. Astronomers found a unique asteroid for every 10 to 20 hours of exposure time.
[…]
This picture is of the parallel field for the galaxy cluster Abell 370. It was assembled from images taken in visible and infrared light. The field's position on the sky is near the ecliptic, the plane of our solar system. This is the zone in which most asteroids reside, which is why Hubble astronomers saw so many crossings. Hubble deep-sky observations taken along a line-of-sight near the plane of our solar system commonly record asteroid trails.
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/hubble-sees-nearby-asteroids-photobombing-distant-galaxies

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Sun Nov 05, 2017 1:41 am

Image

Interstellar Visitor A/2017 U1

The fast-moving object, now named A/2017 U1, was initially spotted on 18 October in Hawaii by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawaii. Professor Alan Fitzsimmons from the School of Mathematics and Physics at Queen’s, together with colleagues in the UK, USA and Chile have been tracking it using powerful telescopes across the world.

Commenting on the project, Professor Fitzsimmons said: “By Wednesday this week it became almost certain this object was alien to our solar system. We immediately started studying it that night with the William Herschel Telescope in the Canary Islands, then on Thursday night with the Very Large Telescope in Chile.”

The initial data implies it is a small rocky or icy object that may have been drifting through our galaxy for millions or even billions of years, before entering our solar system by chance. The object flew into the solar system from above, was close to the Sun last month, and is now already on its way back out to the stars.
http://nineplanets.org/news/

Rama? :mrgreen:

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby shemp » Sun Nov 05, 2017 1:43 am

This is why we need a wall. To keep out alien asteroids.
"It is not I who is mad! It is I who is crazy!" -- Ren Hoek

"[... it seems most strange that... ] the Creator of Heaven and Earth resorted to the womb of a certain Jewish lady, grew there for nine months and was born as an infant, and afterwards grew up and was betrayed into the hands of his enemies who sentenced him to death and executed him, and that afterwards... he came to life and returned to his original place. The mind of a Jew, or any other person, simply cannot tolerate these assertions. If you have listened all your life to the priests who have filled your brain and the marrow of your bones with this doctrine, and it has settled into you because of that accustomed habit. [I would argue that if you were hearing these ideas for the first time, now, as a grown adult], you would never have accepted them." -- Rabbi Moses ben Nahman, defending the Talmud at the Disputation of Barcelona, July 1263.

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Mon Nov 06, 2017 2:13 am


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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Abdul Alhazred » Mon Nov 06, 2017 4:01 pm

A Dust Jet from the Surface of Comet 67P
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap171106.html (NASA)
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Tue Nov 07, 2017 3:12 am

Image
Captured using the exceptional sky-surveying abilities of the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) at ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile, this deep view reveals the secrets of the luminous members of the Fornax Cluster, one of the richest and closest galaxy clusters to the Milky Way. This 2.3-gigapixel image is one of the largest images ever released by ESO.

Perhaps the most fascinating member of the cluster is NGC 1316, a galaxy that has experienced a dynamic history, being formed by the merger of multiple smaller galaxies. The gravitational distortions of the galaxy's adventurous past have left their mark on its lenticular structure [1]. Large ripples, loops and arcs embedded in the starry outer envelope were first observed in the 1970s, and they remain an active field of study for contemporary astronomers, who use the latest telescope technology to observe the finer details of NGC 1316's unusual structure through a combination of imaging and modelling.

The mergers that formed NGC 1316 led to an influx of gas, which fuels an exotic astrophysical object at its centre: a supermassive black hole with a mass roughly 150 million times that of the Sun. As it accretes mass from its surroundings, this cosmic monster produces immensely powerful jets of high-energy particles , that in turn give rise to the characteristic lobes of emission seen at radio wavelengths, making NGC 1316 the fourth-brightest radio source in the sky [2].

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171025090521.htm

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Bruce » Tue Nov 07, 2017 5:02 am

Witness wrote: VLT Survey Telescope


Cracks me up how terrible scientist are at naming things.

VLT = Very Large Telescope

Another example is the name they gave to our galactic neighborhood, our place in the universe that contains the galaxies nearest to us: The Local Group. Jeebus, even calling it "You Are Here" on the map of the universe would have been more imaginative.

Perhaps the best name for something in recent history is the "quark", but what are the names of the types of quarks? Up, down, top, bottom, strange, charm.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quark

Charm?? :|

Anyways, back to space.

Image
Such potential!

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Anaxagoras » Tue Nov 07, 2017 6:33 am

Bruce wrote:
Witness wrote: VLT Survey Telescope


Cracks me up how terrible scientist are at naming things.

VLT = Very Large Telescope

Another example is the name they gave to our galactic neighborhood, our place in the universe that contains the galaxies nearest to us: The Local Group. Jeebus, even calling it "You Are Here" on the map of the universe would have been more imaginative.


How about the BFR?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BFR_(rocket)

Big Fucking Rocket (although there is clean version too, for the kiddies or the church ladies, but we all know what it really stands for).
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby sparks » Tue Nov 07, 2017 1:16 pm

Indeed: Penises In Space!
You can lead them to knowledge, but you can't make them think.

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Wed Nov 08, 2017 4:04 am

Image
A striking new image captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the galaxy NGC 4490. The scattered and warped appearance of the galaxy is the result of a cosmic collision with another galaxy, NGC 4485. The pink fireworks in this image are regions of intense star formation, triggered by the past collision.
http://www.sci-news.com/astronomy/hubble-ngc-4490-05274.html

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Postby Witness » Wed Nov 08, 2017 5:36 am

sparks wrote:Indeed: Penises In Space!

Slightly
NSFW:
Image
The Fascinus

In Ancient Rome, the fascinus was the embodiment of the divine phallus. A Roman effigy or amulet in the shape of a penis is known as a fascinum. The English word “fascinate” derives from the Latin fascinum and the related verb fascinare, that is: “to enchant or bewitch using the power of the fascinus.” In Ancient Rome it was believed that if a person cast a hostile look towards somebody else, the victim of this evil eye would be cursed - envy was thought to bring bad luck to the person envied. The humorous fascinus was believed to work as a medicus invidiae or a “doctor for envy” by making people laugh and thus preventing any jealous or malicious glances towards the person who wore or held it. The phallus is often winged or comically enlarged because the Ancient Romans considered exaggerated or strange images to be the most amusing - besides the fascinus, effigies of hunchbacked men or deformed women were also used to deflect the evil eye.

Graphic representations of the effect the fascinus had on the evil eye can be seen in many Ancient Roman artworks - one mosaic depicts a phallus ejaculating into a disembodied eye, and a 1st-century terracotta sculpture shows two phalluses with arms and legs working together to saw an eyeball in half.


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