Cool astronomy photos

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by sparks » Thu Mar 08, 2018 9:12 pm

Color enhancement of visual data is not always intuitive.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Fri Mar 09, 2018 3:55 am

I think we should be cautious when scientific data is presented visually: so much can be tweaked (and not only the colors) to please or convince the visual animals we are.



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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Fri Mar 09, 2018 10:10 pm


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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Mon Mar 12, 2018 4:04 am

Image

Shockwave on the sun following a flare.

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Rob Lister » Mon Mar 12, 2018 9:24 am

I wonder what the speed of that wave front.

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by sparks » Mon Mar 12, 2018 4:08 pm

How much energy was required to make it so?
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Tue Mar 13, 2018 4:52 am

Polaris timelapse, with a twist:


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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Bruce » Tue Mar 13, 2018 6:20 am

Witness wrote:Image

Shockwave on the sun following a flare.
It's easy to forget the scale of things when looking at videos of the sun. Had the earth been within that shockwave, it probably would have exploded in a puff of dust.
Such potential!

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Wed Mar 14, 2018 1:26 am

Image
Phys.org wrote:This image was originally meant to track the movement of sand dunes near the North Pole of Mars, but what's on the ground in between the dunes is just as interesting!

The ground has parallel dark and light stripes from upper left to lower right in this area. In the dark stripes, we see piles of boulders at regular intervals.

What organized these boulders into neatly-spaced piles? In the Arctic back on Earth, rocks can be organized by a process called "frost heave." With frost heave, repeatedly freezing and thawing of the ground can bring rocks to the surface and organize them into piles, stripes, or even circles. On Earth, one of these temperature cycles takes a year, but on Mars it might be connected to changes in the planet's orbit around the Sun that take much longer.

The map is projected here at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 32 centimeters (12.6 inches) per pixel (with 1 x 1 binning); objects on the order of 96 centimeters (37.8 inches) across are resolved.] North is up.
https://phys.org/news/2018-03-image-cas ... iles.html#

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Fid » Wed Mar 14, 2018 11:30 pm

You want to see seriously weird land forms go to Utah. My late husband grew up in walking distance of a little volcano (extinct)

Chances are if you had rocks on your athletic track it came from Fillmore Utah.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Thu Mar 15, 2018 2:34 am

↑ But do you have such nice craters there, hu, do you? :mrgreen:

Image
Viscous, lobate flow features are commonly found at the bases of slopes in the mid-latitudes of Mars, and are often associated with gullies.

These features are bound by ridges that resemble terrestrial moraines, suggesting that these deposits are ice-rich, or may have been ice-rich in the past. The source of the ice is unclear, but there is some thought that it is deposited from the atmosphere during periods of high obliquity, also known as axial tilt.

The flow features in this image are particularly massive and the bounding scarps appear very high standing and are layered as well. Take a look at the stereo anaglyph for a 3-D view.

The map is projected here at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 25.9 centimeters (10.2 inches) per pixel (with 1 x 1 binning); objects on the order of 82 centimeters (32.2 inches) across are resolved.] North is up.
https://phys.org/news/2017-03-image-mas ... .html#nRlv

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by sparks » Thu Mar 15, 2018 5:15 am

Listy had a colonoscopy?
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Fri Mar 16, 2018 5:00 am

Image

A meteor, the Milky Way, the Moon and our hot Earth. 8)

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Anaxagoras » Fri Mar 16, 2018 5:26 am

That seems like a tough one to get the exposure right. So you can see the stars and the clouds without the moon or lava being overexposed.

(Arguably the moon is overexposed.)
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Sun Mar 18, 2018 4:13 am

Image
Scintillating Sirius

The seemingly pop art inspired canvas of the rainbow of colours exhibited by the brightest star in our sky, Sirius. These colours are obvious to the naked eye and more so through the eyepiece of a telescope, but are difficult to capture in an image. To do this the photographer had to somehow ‘freeze’ each colour as it happened by taking a series of videos at different levels of focus and then extracted the frames from each video to make up this composite image. By capturing the star out of focus, the light from Sirius was spread out over a larger area, which resulted in the colours it displayed being more obvious. The image is made up of 782 different frames at different levels of focus. There is a single frame of a focused Sirius in the centre of the image.

Stokesley, North Yorkshire, UK. Jan 11, 2016.

Canon EOS 600D camera with Star Adventurer tracking mount, 250 mm lens, ISO 3200, composite of 782 images

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Abdul Alhazred » Sun Mar 18, 2018 12:05 pm

Best viewed full screen, explanation at link.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180318.html

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Mon Mar 19, 2018 3:41 am

↑ Complement:


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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Wed Mar 28, 2018 4:45 am

Maui, Hawaiʻi.

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Mon Apr 02, 2018 2:38 am

Image
The Martian moons Phobos and Deimos, appear to be in motion in this animation created from 19 images taken by the Mars Odyssey orbiter’s Thermal Emission Imaging System, or THEMIS, camera. The images were taken in visible-wavelength light. THEMIS also recorded thermal-infrared imagery in the same scan.
The apparent motion is due to progression of the camera’s pointing during the 17-second span of the 15 February 2018, observation, not from motion of the two moons. This was the second observation of Phobos by Mars Odyssey; the first was on 29 September 2017. Researchers have been using THEMIS to examine Mars since early 2002, but the maneuver turning the orbiter around to point the camera at Phobos was developed only recently.
The distance to Phobos from Odyssey during the observation was about 5,615 kilometers (3,489 miles). The distance to Deimos from Odyssey during the observation was about 19,670 kilometers (12,222 miles).
https://astronomynow.com/2018/04/01/mar ... in-motion/

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Anaxagoras » Tue Apr 10, 2018 9:00 am

Upcoming mission:

New NASA Planet Hunter Is Launching One Week from Today
NASA's next exoplanet-hunting spacecraft will take to the skies one week from today (April 9), if all goes according to plan.

TESS will do this via the "transit" method, noting the tiny brightness dips that result when a planet crosses the face of its host star from the spacecraft's perspective. This is the same strategy employed by NASA's famed Kepler space telescope, which has found about two-thirds of the 3,700 known exoplanets to date. [NASA's TESS Exoplanet-Hunting Mission in Pictures]

But Kepler's finds are mostly faraway worlds at least several hundred light-years from Earth. TESS will aim to find planets close enough to be investigated in depth by other instruments — especially NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, the $8.8 billion behemoth scheduled to launch in 2020.

TESS will do its work from a unique vantage point: a highly elliptical orbit that no other spacecraft has ever occupied, mission officials have said. After launch, TESS will gradually expand its orbit until it flies close enough to the moon to receive a gravitational assist, according to a new NASA video.

"This slingshot will move it into a stable orbit that is tipped at about 40 degrees from the moon's orbital plane," the video's narrator explains.

TESS will end up zipping around our planet once every 13.7 days.

"TESS orbits Earth in exactly half the time it takes the moon to orbit once," the narrator says. "This feature helps stabilize the spacecraft's orbit against tugs from the moon's gravity."

TESS will spend at least two years in this orbit. The farthest point, or apogee, will be 232,000 miles (373,000 kilometers) from Earth, allowing the spacecraft to survey part of the sky without interference from the moon or our planet. The closest point in the orbit, or perigee, will be 67,000 miles (108,000 km), which is about three times the altitude of geosynchronous satellites. During every close encounter with Earth, TESS will beam back information it collected from its previous round of astronomical observations.

TESS will spend its first year observing the celestial Southern Hemisphere, swinging between different locations in the sky every 27 days so that it always points away from the sun. Then, TESS will observe the entire Northern Hemisphere in 27-day slices during the spacecraft's second year.

This broad survey strategy offers another contrast with Kepler's original mission, during which that spacecraft stared continuously at about 150,000 stars in a single patch of sky.
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