Cool astronomy photos

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Witness
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Wed Aug 01, 2018 4:32 am

Supersharp images from new VLT adaptive optics

ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has achieved first light with a new adaptive optics mode called laser tomography -- and has captured remarkably sharp test images of the planet Neptune and other objects. The MUSE instrument working with the GALACSI adaptive optics module, can now use this new technique to correct for turbulence at different altitudes in the atmosphere. It is now possible to capture images from the ground at visible wavelengths that are sharper than those from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 082220.htm

Image
This image of the planet Neptune was obtained during the testing of the Narrow-Field adaptive optics mode of the MUSE/GALACSI instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope. The corrected image is sharper than a comparable image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.
Hubble image for comparison:

Image
http://hubblesite.org/images/news/69-neptune

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Anaxagoras
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Anaxagoras » Thu Aug 02, 2018 4:30 am

If anyone is interested:

Why NASA is struggling to get its most powerful space telescope off the ground
NASA has long been plagued by critically underestimating spacecraft costs. The Hubble Space Telescope, initially projected to cost $200 million, wound up costing $1.2 billion to develop. After, its mirror required multiple fixes, which racked up billions more in expenses. A recent report from NASA’s inspector general identified a culprit of NASA’s chronic underestimation: a culture of optimism. He noted that NASA does not consider meeting cost and schedule deadlines as a measure of success and that the agency expects more money to be provided if projects go over budget. That has certainly been the case for JWST, which has continued to receive funding as its costs increase. Congress capped the development budget at $8 billion, but lawmakers are still expected to fund the telescope’s new budget overruns. The space agency is also incentivized to low-ball on price when presenting projects to Congress, making them much more appealing at first blush.
"A culture of optimism" or more cynically, a culture that understands that you intentionally low-ball the estimate so that you can get approval to start the project and then count on the fact that you can go back to get more money later when the inevitable cost overruns occur.
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
William Shakespeare

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Wed Aug 08, 2018 2:40 am

APOD wrote:What wonders lie at the center of our Galaxy? In Jules Verne's science fiction classic A Journey to the Center of the Earth, Professor Liedenbrock and his fellow explorers encounter many strange and exciting wonders. Astronomers already know of some of the bizarre objects that exist at our Galactic center, including like vast cosmic dust clouds, bright star clusters, swirling rings of gas, and even a supermassive black hole. Much of the Galactic Center is shielded from our view in visible light by the intervening dust and gas, but it can be explored using other forms of electromagnetic radiation. The featured video is actually a digital zoom into the Milky Way's center which starts by utilizing visible light images from the Digitized Sky Survey. As the movie proceeds, the light shown shifts to dust-penetrating infrared and highlights gas clouds that were recently discovered in 2013 to be falling toward central black hole. In 2018 May, observations of a star passing near the Milky Way's central black hole showed, for the first time, a gravitational redshift of the star's light -- as expected from Einstein's general relativity.
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180729.html


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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Sat Aug 11, 2018 1:00 pm


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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Sun Aug 12, 2018 1:19 am

Went out on the balcony and immediately saw a meteor, even with unadapted eyes.

So perhaps you should have a look. Interactive details: https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/m ... rseid.html.

Good luck! :)

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by sparks » Sun Aug 12, 2018 1:33 am

Just waiting for it to get dark here....
You can lead them to knowledge, but you can't make them think.