Cool astronomy photos

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Thu Oct 18, 2018 2:59 am


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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Abdul Alhazred » Mon Oct 22, 2018 12:40 pm

Apollo 12 Visits Surveyor 3 (NASA)

Too cool to be embedded. Must be viewed full size. :coolspecs:
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by sparks » Mon Oct 22, 2018 5:48 pm

An obvious fake by Betsy Ross to discredit Teh Chump.... :)


Wait.

What?
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Tue Oct 23, 2018 1:34 am

Image
What kind of celestial object is this? A relatively normal galaxy -- but seen from its edge. Many disk galaxies are actually just as thin as NGC 5866, pictured here, but are not seen edge-on from our vantage point. A perhaps more familiar galaxy seen edge-on is our own Milky Way Galaxy. Cataloged as M102 and NGC 5866, the Spindle galaxy has numerous and complex dust lanes appearing dark and red, while many of the bright stars in the disk give it a more blue underlying hue. The blue disk of young stars can be seen extending past the dust in the extremely thin galactic plane. There is evidence that the Spindle galaxy has cannibalized smaller galaxies over the past billion years or so, including multiple streams of faint stars, dark dust that extends away from the main galactic plane, and a surrounding group of galaxies (not shown). In general, many disk galaxies become thin because the gas that forms them collides with itself as it rotates about the gravitational center. The Spindle galaxy lies about 50 million light years distant toward the constellation of the Dragon (Draco).
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180725.html

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Abdul Alhazred » Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:34 am

If you were a Martian who could see ultraviolet, what would you see looking in our direction?

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap181028.html
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Rob Lister » Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:57 am

Abdul Alhazred wrote:
Sun Oct 28, 2018 11:34 am
If you were a Martian who could see ultraviolet, what would you see looking in our direction?

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap181028.html
Wouldn't a Martian evolve to see slightly more in the infrared?

I think you meant Mercurian perhaps.

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by shemp » Sun Oct 28, 2018 6:03 pm

Martians would have blown up Earth by now. It blocks their view of Venus.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by sparks » Mon Oct 29, 2018 4:13 am

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Thu Nov 08, 2018 12:34 am

Image

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Thu Nov 08, 2018 2:38 am

And the Parker Solar Probe has started its flights around the sun. Details:

http://parkersolarprobe.jhuapl.edu/
https://www.space.com/42344-parker-sola ... roach.html

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Fri Nov 09, 2018 2:40 am

RIP, Kepler:
Space telescope dead after long 'blockbuster' mission

The most prolific planet-hunting machine in history has signed off.

NASA's Kepler space telescope, which has discovered 70 percent of the 3,800 confirmed alien worlds to date, has run out of fuel, agency officials announced today (Oct. 30). Kepler can no longer reorient itself to study cosmic objects or beam its data home to Earth, so the legendary instrument's in-space work is done after nearly a decade.

And that work has been transformative.

"Kepler has taught us that planets are ubiquitous and incredibly diverse," Kepler project scientist Jessie Dotson, who's based at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, told Space.com. "It's changed how we look at the night sky."

Today's announcement was not unexpected. Kepler has been running low on fuel for months, and mission managers put the spacecraft to sleep several times recently to extend its operational life as much as possible. But the end couldn't be forestalled forever; Kepler's tank finally went dry two weeks ago, mission team members said during a telecon with reporters today.

"This marks the end of spacecraft operations for Kepler, and the end of the collection of science data," Paul Hertz, head of NASA's Astrophysics Division, said during the telecon.
https://www.euronews.com/2018/10/31/kep ... ncna920186

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https://www.space.com/32847-nasa-kepler ... tures.html

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Fri Nov 09, 2018 10:24 pm

Image
This image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the Serpens Nebula, a stellar nursery about 1300 light-years away. Within the nebula, in the upper right of the image, a shadow is created by the protoplanetary disc surrounding the star HBC 672. While the disc of debris is too tiny to be seen even by Hubble, its shadow is projected upon the cloud in which it was born. In this view, the feature -- nicknamed the Bat Shadow -- spans approximately 200 times the diameter of our own Solar System.
Credit: NASA, ESA, and STScI
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 141451.htm

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Abdul Alhazred » Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:27 pm

Astronaut Exploring: An Apollo 15 Panorama
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap181111.html

Really to get it you need to open the pic full size in its own tab and scroll around.
Fantastically detailed.

Image

More explanation at link.
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Mon Nov 12, 2018 12:38 am

Image
This composite of images spaced some 5 to 9 days apart, from late April (bottom right) through November 5 (top left), traces the retrograde motion of ruddy-colored Mars through planet Earth's night sky. To connect the dots and dates in this 2018 Mars retrograde loop, just slide your cursor over the picture (and check out this animation). But Mars didn't actually reverse the direction of its orbit. Instead, the apparent backwards motion with respect to the background stars is a reflection of the motion of the Earth itself. Retrograde motion can be seen each time Earth overtakes and laps planets orbiting farther from the Sun, the Earth moving more rapidly through its own relatively close-in orbit. On July 27, Mars was near its favorable 2018 parihelic opposition, when Mars was closest to the Sun in its orbit while also opposite the Sun in Earth's sky. For that date, the frame used in this composite was taken during the total lunar eclipse.
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap181108.html

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by shemp » Mon Nov 12, 2018 1:20 am

HA! DIS PROVEZ DAT EARTH IS CENTR OF UNIVERZE! CHEKMATE ATHEISTS!!!111!!11111ELEVENTY!!
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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Anaxagoras » Mon Nov 12, 2018 5:00 am

A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
William Shakespeare

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Re: Cool astronomy photos

Post by Witness » Mon Nov 12, 2018 5:15 pm

ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) has captured an unprecedented series of images showing the passage of the exoplanet Beta Pictoris b around its parent star. This young, massive exoplanet was initially discovered in 2008 using the NACO instrument at the VLT. Astronomers have since tracked the exoplanet, making observations from late 2014 until late 2016 using the VLT's Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch instrument (SPHERE). These observations are shown here as a time-lapse depicting the passage of Beta Pictoris b around its host star.

Credit: ESO/Lagrange/SPHERE consortium
https://www.eso.org/public/videos/potw1846a/

The black disk is of course an obstruction in the telescope to keep the star's light out.