Is Neil Young right about sound quality?

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Witness
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Re: Is Neil Young right about sound quality?

Post by Witness » Sun Feb 26, 2017 1:50 am

Perhaps you'll be interested by this vid: a dude with his own electron microscope ( :shock: ) looks at LPs, CDs, and more:

[youtube][/youtube]

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Re: Is Neil Young right about sound quality?

Post by robinson » Tue Feb 28, 2017 2:49 pm

Image

Image
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Re: Is Neil Young right about sound quality?

Post by Rob Lister » Tue Feb 28, 2017 3:09 pm

I do not understand the graphs.

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Re: Is Neil Young right about sound quality?

Post by Witness » Wed Mar 01, 2017 12:52 am

Abdul Alhazred wrote:How about HD LPs with a laser needle? Really no friction.

And somehow make it digital.

What a great idea! :BigGrin3:
There's a small article on Wikipedia.
A laser turntable (or optical turntable) is a phonograph that plays LP records (and other gramophone records) usually made of heat-stamped vinyl by using laser beams as the pickup instead of using a stylus as in conventional turntables.
Here the machine of the IRENE project (http://irene.lbl.gov/ – lots of PDFs at the link):

Image
Using methods derived from our work on instrumentation for particle physics we have investigated the problem of audio reconstruction from mechanical recordings. The idea was to acquire digital maps of the surface of the media, without contact, and then apply image analysis methods to recover the audio data and reduce noise.
[…]
Currently the research centers around two efforts. IRENE (top image above) is a scanning machine for disc records which images with microphotography in two dimensions (2D). It is under evaluation at the Library of Congress. For cylinder media, with vertical cut groove, and to obtain more detailed measurements of discs, a three dimensional (3D) scanner is under development (bottom image). I it is planned to begin evaluating this device at the Library of Congress in 2009.

In late 2007 and early 2008 we were involved in a project to restore the earliest sound recording in history. This was a “phonautograph” paper recording due to French inventor Edouard-Leon Scott de Martinville.
From many years ago I also remember work done at the EPFL in Switzerland to read LPs with a rounded glass fiber, which read the upper parts of the track, not degraded by the usual stylus. Alas, found no link to that.

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Re: Is Neil Young right about sound quality?

Post by Witness » Fri Jun 30, 2017 3:12 am

After 30 Years, Sony Starts Manufacturing Vinyl Records Again

Proving once again that vinyl records are far from dead, Sony has re-opened a plant in Tokyo.

Sony has announced that it will once again start manufacturing vinyl records. Per the Agence France–Press, the company will start production in Tokyo. Though the company didn’t specify what genres it will produce, records will reportedly include classic and popular Japanese songs.

Sony’s move to manufacture vinyl records comes thirty years after it stopped making them to focus on CDs. In a factory southwest of Tokyo, Sony has installed record-cutting equipment. The company has also enlisted the help of experienced vinyl engineers to reproduce high-quality sound.

In recent years, record sales have enjoyed steady growth. Earlier this year, British industry group BPI found that 2016 vinyl sales reached pre-1991 levels. In the UK alone, sales have skyrocketed 53%, bringing the total to 3.2 million units.

Here in the US, a similar surge has occurred. BuzzAngle Music found that vinyl record sales gained an impressive 25.9%, moving 7.2 million units in 2016. 17.2 million units were shipped that year. Separately, an exclusive report shared with Digital Music News showed that vinyl sales will reach the $800-900 million mark. It will also surpass $1 billion very soon.
https://www.digitalmusicnews.com/2017/0 ... l-records/