Anonymity

The war between wetware and hardware.
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ed
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Anonymity

Post by ed » Fri Sep 09, 2016 11:50 am

I was thinking about this, here in the bunker.

Can you be anonymous on the net? Even if you use an anonymous proxy you still have to communicate with it thru nodes or whatever they are called. Is being anonymous a fantasy?
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Re: Anonymity

Post by Anaxagoras » Fri Sep 09, 2016 11:57 am

Well I've heard that the Tor browser makes it possible. But I'm not an expert so I don't know. I know it isn't foolproof though. People still get caught. I was reading the other day about an FBI sting on a child porn site. They took over the site and then used it to infect the users' computers with malware, and the malware snitched on them.

http://www.tennessean.com/story/news/20 ... /89891134/
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Re: Anonymity

Post by ed » Fri Sep 09, 2016 1:58 pm

Tor isn't secure. I think it's impossible.

Unless, naturally, you are Hillary
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Re: Anonymity

Post by Anaxagoras » Mon Mar 12, 2018 7:59 am

ed wrote:I was thinking about this, here in the bunker.

Can you be anonymous on the net? Even if you use an anonymous proxy you still have to communicate with it thru nodes or whatever they are called. Is being anonymous a fantasy?
Apparently helping people stay anonymous may be a crime:

The FBI Busts Phantom Secure CEO for Allegedly Selling Encrypted Phones to Gangs, Drug Cartels
The FBI has arrested the owner of Phantom Secure, one of a number of phone companies that it claims sells customized BlackBerry and Android devices for use in international criminal organizations.

Per Motherboard, court records and interviews with anonymous sources indicate that the FBI, along with Canadian and Australian police, targeted Phantom Secure for deliberately selling drug cartels phones designed for criminal activity. According to the report, the FBI says that the company and CEO Vincent Ramos knew full well that their devices were being used in violent crime:

A complaint filed in the Southern District of California on Thursday charges Vincent Ramos, the founder and CEO of Canada-based Phantom, with racketeering conspiracy to conduct enterprise affairs, as well as conspiracy to distribute narcotics, and aiding and abetting. Authorities arrested Ramos on Thursday, according to the court docket. Crucially, the complaint alleges that Ramos and Phantom were not simply incidental to a crime, like Apple might be when a criminal uses an iPhone, but that the company was specifically created to facilitate criminal activity.

The phones in question had cameras, microphones, and standard connectivity functions disabled and a version of Pretty Good Privacy that routes messages overseas added, with FBI alleging the company allowed customers to remotely wipe data.

For people allegedly in the business of helping gangs like the Sinaloa Cartel and Hells Angels operate under the radar of the authorities, Phantom staff were remarkably indiscreet. Motherboard reported that some of the company’s customers used email addresses like ““Leadslinger,” “trigger-happy,” “knee_capper9,” and—come on—“the.cartel”. Undercover Canadian police also reported that when asked if the phones were good for “sending MDMA to Montreal,” Phantom staff replied that would be “totally fine.”

“We made it—we made it specifically for this [drug trafficking] too,” Ramos allegedly told undercover police.

The FBI (as well as other US law enforcement organs like the Department of Justice) has been waging a war on encryption technology for a while, claiming that criminals equipped with impregnable mobile devices are interfering with its ability to conduct investigations. It’s also tried to force companies like Apple to build surveillance backdoors into their devices, which could potentially weaken the security features available to normal users with no intent of breaking the law.
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
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Re: Anonymity

Post by Abdul Alhazred » Mon Mar 12, 2018 9:24 am

I think rather in terms of quasi-anonymity.

Enough to deter random harassment? Sure. Easy in fact.

But not enough to prevent the government or a determined enemy.
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Re: Anonymity

Post by Witness » Tue Mar 13, 2018 4:08 am

I've read an article which said, roughly from memory, "Cruising the Web with Tor is donning a Christmas tree costume."

But there are so many "expert" opinions… :mrgreen:

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Re: Anonymity

Post by sparks » Wed Mar 14, 2018 2:34 am

Well, if one isn't doing ... anything ... Wrong...

You can lead them to knowledge, but you can't make them think.

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Re: Anonymity

Post by Witness » Thu Mar 15, 2018 5:40 am

And it's not only the Internet, just add a tad of facial recognition:

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https://www.wired.com/2002/11/londons-p ... ling-down/

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Re: Anonymity

Post by Witness » Wed May 23, 2018 12:57 am

How to disable WebRTC in Chrome

Security issue caused by the WebRTC feature in Chrome

It is well known that the WebRTC feature in Chrome will leak your IP address even if you are behind a proxy server or using a VPN service. While most people who do not use proxy or VPN reveals their IP addresses to whatever web server they visit all the time, the IP address is the most easily accessible piece of information to track a website visitor. For the minimum, big companies such as Google and Facebook are using the IP addresses to analyzing your habits and behavior and send your highly-targeted ads. While most people are fine with targeted ads, there are people who don't like to be tracked at all for whatever reason. They will choose to use either proxy or VPN service to avoid being tracked. However, in a browser which supports WebRTC, including Chrome, Slimjet and Firefox, the website owner can easily obtain the website visitor's IP address by a simple piece of Javascript.

In addition to that, the WebRTC Media Device Enumeration API also enables the website owner to obtain a unique media device id from the user, which can be used to uniquely identify the visitor.

While Firefox provides an option to turn off the WebRTC feature, there is no such option available in Chrome, which isn't completely surprising considering the fact that Chrome isn't known fore being generous with options.
[…]
How to verify the IP leackage issue is fixed

Here are three websites which can let you detect if your browser is liable to the IP leakage issue caused by WebRTC:

https://www.browserleaks.com/webrtc
https://diafygi.github.io/webrtc-ips/
https://www.perfect-privacy.com/webrtc-leaktest/
https://www.slimjet.com/en/how-to-disab ... chrome.php

I haven't tested (yet) the sites.

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Re: Anonymity

Post by Witness » Fri Aug 17, 2018 1:51 am

An Aussie rant:
The government is ratcheting up its surveillance powers. But we can stop this

The good news is, the war on maths is postponed, because maths won. The government appears to have given up on its ambition of undermining the global encryption standards that underpin secure communications on the internet.

That’s the only good news, because there’s very little positive to be said about the government’s latest lunge for intrusive powers embodied in the Telecommunications and other Legislation Amendment (Assistance and Access) Bill 2018. The template, by now, is so familiar you can probably recite this next bit by heart, but let’s run through it because the details matter.

Exploiting legitimate fears of terrorism and child abuse, the government wants expansive new powers which will allow it to hack your phone for purposes that are actually as loose as “protecting the public revenue; or the interests of Australia’s national security, the interests of Australia’s foreign relations, or the interests of Australia’s national economic well-being”. The bill sweeps the whole world’s telecommunications sector into its remit, with the intent not so much of breaking encryption standards, as making them irrelevant.

For an encrypted mail service or messaging app to be of any use, it needs to be decrypted at either end – so that you can see what’s being said. This new bill provides police, clandestine agencies and ministers with a startling range of tools for compromising devices and services in order to intercept communications at either end of the encryption “pipeline”. The tools cover everything from a 10 year jail term for refusing to unlock your phone, to legally binding orders forcing service providers to install malware on your device or create whole new compromised services for people to use unwittingly. The potential for misuse and abuse is extraordinary, but it is unlikely we’ll ever hear about it, owing to the steep new penalties for disclosing that these orders are in force. But maybe, the next time you’re asked to install an update to your favourite messaging app, you’ll be downloading something that isn’t what it appears to be.
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfr ... -stop-this

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Re: Anonymity

Post by Captain » Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:30 am

It's for your own good...
You run one time, you got yourself a set of chains. You run twice you got yourself two sets. You ain't gonna need no third set, 'cause you gonna get your mind right.

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Re: Anonymity

Post by Witness » Mon Aug 20, 2018 12:47 am

Captain wrote:
Fri Aug 17, 2018 7:30 am
It's for your own good...


Thanks, Captain. :|

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Re: Anonymity

Post by Grammatron » Wed Aug 22, 2018 6:31 am

ed wrote:
Fri Sep 09, 2016 11:50 am
I was thinking about this, here in the bunker.

Can you be anonymous on the net? Even if you use an anonymous proxy you still have to communicate with it thru nodes or whatever they are called. Is being anonymous a fantasy?
It may sound like a contradiction but you can be anonymous unless someone is looking for you.