Japan

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Doctor X
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Re: Japan

Post by Doctor X »

Way to cull his competition.

Given that the Japanese live into their 80s, what are they suppose to do with the second half of their lives?

Other than to convince their waifutachi to murder them?





What?

– J.D.
Anaxagoras
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Re: Japan

Post by Anaxagoras »

Reading on, it seems that his idea is that they would have to find a new job, and this would move workers from stagnating industries to growing industries. The sort of idea that might appeal to someone thinking about the economy on a macro level and not how it affects individuals. Of course, you would have start all over from the bottom and probably take a pay cut.
Doctor X
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Re: Japan

Post by Doctor X »

And it is not as if Japan has had a long-seated prejudice against those who change jobs.

– J.D.
Ben Trovado
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Re: Japan

Post by Ben Trovado »

They could claim to be a transfer student.

That happens all the time halfway through a season.
shuize
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Re: Japan

Post by shuize »

Anaxagoras wrote: Wed Sep 22, 2021 1:03 am CEO of Japan beverage giant Suntory calls for age-45 retirement
TOKYO -- People should have to retire at age 45 from their company as part of post coronavirus pandemic economic recovery plans, Japanese beverage giant Suntory Holdings Ltd. CEO Takeshi Niinami stated recently, sparking a swift and furious social media reaction.

Japan needs "age-45 mandatory retirement, and a system that makes sure individuals aren't dependent on companies," Niinami declared on Sept. 9. He rowed back on the comment somewhat the following day, saying, "It might have been clumsy of me to use the term 'retirement age.'"

The Suntory president was participating in the Japan Association of Corporate Executives' summer seminar when he made the comments on both days. On Sept. 9, he was arguing that Japan needed to rid itself of its lifelong employment and service time-based salary models, and used mandatory retirement at age 45 as a concrete example of how to do this. Niinami sought to demonstrate that the measure would spur workers to move into growth industries and rejuvenate corporate organizational structure.

When his comments were reported, however, social media users poured scorn on the Suntory head, with responses including, "It's impossible for regular people to change jobs at age 45," and "This is just a lay-off scheme."
OK, you go first. Put your money where your mouth is. :roll:

Of course he can probably afford to retire, but not most people.

He is already 62, so he's calling for people much younger than himself to be fired.

If they'd restructure social security and my university payout, I'd be very tempted.

I wouldn't even expect full benefits, just let me collect what I've earned up until now.
Doctor X
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Re: Japan

Post by Doctor X »

Researcher sees lesson for today in tragedy of settlers in Manchuria

Tezuka believes the immigrants — many of whom ended up in labor camps or dead after Soviet forces entered Manchuria in 1945 — and the local leaders who had encouraged them to move paid the price of blind faith in the authorities and that such unqualified trust is a trait still alive in Japanese society today.

“I think that particularly for Japanese people it is still a strong tendency, and that is a very dangerous thing. Questioning should be the most valuable lesson we can learn from the tragedy,” Tezuka said in a recent interview ahead of the 90th anniversary of the Manchurian Incident in 1931, which preceded the establishment of Manchukuo and marked the beginning of Japan’s military involvement in China.

Local leaders, such as Mori Kurumizawa, a former mayor of Kawano village in Nagano Prefecture whose diaries Tezuka has studied, played a pivotal role in encouraging emigration to Manchuria, he said.

The diaries showed how a young, idealistic, and liberal village mayor filled with passion for serving the public became a cog of state policy and eventually took his own life out of remorse following the war, according to Tezuka.

時間の日本[だめ! – Ed.]
– J.D.
Doctor X
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Re: Japan

Post by Doctor X »

How the Kamikaze created the Shinkansen.



For those of you who remember Connections. . . .

– J.D.
Doctor X
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Re: Japan

Post by Doctor X »

New Prime Minister is not some skirt!

– J.D.
Anaxagoras
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Re: Japan

Post by Anaxagoras »

Doctor X wrote: Sun Sep 26, 2021 5:57 am How the Kamikaze created the Shinkansen.


For those of you who remember Connections. . . .

– J.D.
Blocked in Japan (by the uploader).
Anaxagoras
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Re: Japan

Post by Anaxagoras »

Doctor X wrote: Wed Sep 29, 2021 6:43 am New Prime Minister is not some skirt!

– J.D.
Mr Kishida will succeed Yoshihide Suga, who decided to step down after just one year in office.

His first mission as prime minister will be to lead the LDP to victory in an upcoming general election.

The party's popularity fell after it pushed to host the Tokyo Olympics despite public opposition.

Mr Kishida, a former foreign minister, beat out Taro Kono, who was widely regarded as the most popular candidate.

Given the LDP's majority in parliament, Mr Kishida's position as prime minister has been all but cemented.
I knew it would be either Kishida or Kono, but I'm a little bit surprised that it wasn't the latter. There's a general election coming up and you might think they would go with the one who's more popular with the voting public. Kishida will be the next PM, but for how long? His tenure will be rather short if the LDP does not prevail in the upcoming election . . .

That said, the LDP usually does win. And Kishida should at least be more popular than Suga was. :notsure:
The LDP has almost continuously been in power since its foundation in 1955—a period called the 1955 System—with the exception of a period between 1993 and 1994, and again from 2009 to 2012.
Anaxagoras
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Re: Japan

Post by Anaxagoras »

There doesn't seem to be a consistent major opposition party in Japan. It changes from election to election.

Here's the current alternative:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitut ... y_of_Japan
The Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan (立憲民主党, Rikken-minshutō); CDP), sometimes abbreviated to Minshutō (民主党),[12] is a centre-left political party in Japan.[13] The party was founded in October 2017 as a split from the Democratic Party ahead of the 2017 general election. In late 2020, the party was re-founded following a merger with majorities of the Democratic Party for the People and the Social Democratic Party as well as some independent lawmakers. As of 2021 the CDP is considered the primary opposition party in Japan and is the second largest party in the National Diet behind the ruling Liberal Democratic Party.[14] The party is led by Yukio Edano.
I guess this is the successor party to Minshutō (Democratic Party), the last party other than the LDP to hold power, from 2009-2012.

The fact that they keep splitting and reforming and renaming the party though makes it hard to follow.

(And of course there are also some minor parties, like the Communist Party, which has its loyalists, but will probably never hold power.)
Doctor X
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Re: Japan

Post by Doctor X »

Anaxagoras wrote: Wed Sep 29, 2021 10:06 amBlocked in Japan (by the uploader).
https://www.proxfree.com/youtube-proxy.php

– J.D.
Doctor X
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Re: Japan

Post by Doctor X »



– J.D.
Doctor X
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Re: Japan

Post by Doctor X »

https://img.memecdn.com/Meanwhile-in-Japan_o_140479.jpg

– J.D.
Anaxagoras
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Location: Yokohama/Tokyo, Japan

Re: Japan

Post by Anaxagoras »

Anaxagoras wrote: Sun Nov 26, 2017 3:49 am Construction has begun on Japan's maglev train:

In the wee hours, Shinagawa a hive of activity for new maglev
Maglev line starting date still up in the air as costs keep rising

I know, what a shocker! Who could have guessed that there would be delays and cost overruns.

There's a political problem too:
The much-ballyhooed magnetic levitation train line project linking Tokyo with Nagoya has been stuck in limbo since Shizuoka Prefecture refused to allow construction for what could be one of the world’s fastest trains.

Central Japan Railway Co. (JR Tokai) initially planned to have the Chuo Shinkansen Line in operation between the capital’s Shinagawa Station and Nagoya Station in 2027, with a later connection to Osaka.

The maglev line will go through Shizuoka Prefecture, but the prefectural government has raised concerns that construction work could change the volume of water available along the Oigawa river, which runs through the prefecture and is part and parcel of residents’ livelihoods.

JR Tokai is trying to win over municipal governments in the prefecture, but those talks are in the very early stages.

The planned maglev line will have no train stop in Shizuoka Prefecture, so residents expect no direct benefits from the project.

Although there is no indication of how long the prospective opening date will be put off, the total project cost estimate has grown to 10.5 trillion yen ($95 billion).
So, you see the problem. A prefecture in Japan is sort of like a state in the USA. They each have their own local government and a governor. The line has to go through (mostly under) Shizuoka, there's no way around it. But since it doesn't stop in Shizuoka, there's no real benefit to them. Only a burden. So there's a "what's in it for us" problem. They need to be on board with it, but there isn't a direct benefit to them. Maybe some jobs in the construction phase and maybe some maintenance jobs, but no maglev train service. I imagine it's a matter of "how much will you pay us"? Which will add more to the cost.
Doctor X
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Re: Japan

Post by Doctor X »

Not good:
https://cdn-japantimes.com/wp-content/u ... 19017.jpeg

Gymnast Hitomi Hatakeda suffers serious spinal injury during training

Kitakyushu – Gymnast Hitomi Hatakeda suffered a serious spinal injury on Wednesday after falling off the uneven bars during training, the Japan Gymnastics Association said.

Hatakeda, who appeared at the Tokyo Olympics, was taken to the hospital and diagnosed with damage to her central spinal cord and bruising of the cervical vertebrae.

The 21-year-old qualified for Thursday’s world championships all-around final in fourth place in Kitakyushu, but was forced to withdraw.

Hatakeda is coached by her mother Yukiko. Her father, Yoshiaki, is a former gymnast who won bronze in the team event for Japan at the 1992 Olympics.

Her younger sister, Chiaki, is also a gymnast.

Japanese Paper Read by the Waifu of Anax
– J. "朝日新聞 Readers Don't Care Who Runs the Country, So Longs as She has Tits!" D.