Perpetual dinosaur thread

What's your artifact doing in Boss Kean's ditch?
Witness
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Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

Discoveries are regularly made, so we'll have a neat thread. (And one day, I'm sure, Pyrrho will rename the sub-forum to Archaeology & Paleontology… :mrgreen: )
New Bird-Like Dinosaur Unearthed in Wyoming

A new species of carnivorous bird-like dinosaur being named Hesperornithoides miessleri has been discovered by an international team of paleontologists from the United States and the United Kingdom.
Details.

They seem extremely cute.

https://i.imgur.com/NSCoUq6.jpg

ed should keep a couple around Lake ed! :)
Witness
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

How wrong you are: birds ⊂ dinosaurs, not the other way round.


Recent find:

https://i.imgur.com/N9XbgSe.jpg
The two-meter long femur at the Angeac-Charente site is thought to have belonged to a sauropod, herbivorous dinosaurs with long necks and tails which were widespread in the late Jurassic era, over 140 million years ago.
Witness
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

Abdul Alhazred wrote: Wed Jul 31, 2019 12:32 pm By definition, there can be no such thing as a bird-like dinosaur.

Dinosaurs are birds.

So they found a bird-like bird. Cool. :P
Feathers Arose 80 Million Years before Birds, Scientists Say

According to a new review paper published in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, feathers arose 250-230 million years ago, during the Early Triassic, when life was recovering from the devastating end-Permian mass extinction.

https://i.imgur.com/C0laEXm.jpg

It is shocking to realize that feathers originated long before birds because feathers have generally been regarded as the key innovation that drove the success of the avian fauna.

However, thousands of fossils from China have shown that many non-avian dinosaurs also had feathers, including feather types not found in birds today.

Those discoveries extended the origin of feathers minimally back to 175 million years ago — about 25 million years before the first generally acknowledged bird, Archaeopteryx.

Recent discoveries of feathers in ornithischian dinosaurs hinted that they are a character of dinosaurs as a whole.

Another startling discovery showed that even pterosaurs had four kinds of feather, apparently similar in form with those of dinosaurs, their closest relatives.

“The oldest bird is still Archaeopteryx first found in the Late Jurassic of southern Germany in 1861, although some species from China are a little older,” said University of Bristol’s Professor Mike Benton, lead author of the paper.

“Those fossils all show a diversity of feathers: down feathers over the body and long, vaned feathers on the wings. But, since 1994, paleontologists have been contending with the perturbing discovery, based on hundreds of amazing specimens from China, that many dinosaurs also had feathers.”
http://www.sci-news.com/biology/feather ... 07256.html
Witness
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

That's the ticket.
Anaxagoras
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Anaxagoras »

It would be hard to argue that a sauropod like a brachiosaurus is a bird.
Witness
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

There is of course no hard transition between non-avian dinosaurs and birds. Remember that Archeopterix himself would have been classified as one more boring small dino if the feathers hadn't left an imprint (in the marvelous Solnhofen limestone, used for lithography). And that the palaeontological record is always lacunar.

An example: Anchiornis ("almost bird", ha ha!)

https://i.imgur.com/bSjzYVi.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/4aqDwjg.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/1arbJ3v.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/TQukfiK.jpg
The small, feathered "dino-birds" dug up in China's Liaoning fossil beds have proved an endless source of confusion. The latest genus to ruffle the feathers of paleontologists is Anchiornis, a tiny dinosaur (not a bird) with unusually long front arms and feathers on its front limbs, hind limbs, and feet. Despite its similarity to Microraptor--another four-winged dino-bird--Anchiornis is believed to have been a troodont dinosaur, and thus a close relative of the much bigger Troodon. Like other feathered dinosaurs of its kind, Anchiornis may have represented an intermediate stage between dinosaurs and modern birds, though it may also have occupied a side branch of avian evolution destined to die out with the dinosaurs.

Recently, a team of scientists analyzed the fossilized melanosomes (pigment cells) of a specimen of Anchiornis, resulting in what may be the first full-color depiction of an extinct dinosaur. It turns out that this dino-bird had an orange, mohawk-like crest of feathers on its head, alternating white- and black-striped feathers running along the width of its wings, and black and red "freckles" spotting its beaked face. This has provided considerable grist for paleo-illustrators, who now have no excuse for depicting Anchiornis with scaly, reptilian skin!
Witness
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

Not a dinosaur (nor a bird :mrgreen: ), but here it goes:
A new pterosaur, or prehistoric flying reptile species, has been discovered in outback Queensland

https://i.imgur.com/BlaGvIr.jpg

The pterosaur, a prehistoric flying reptile, lived amongst the dinosaurs which roamed the Winton region around 96 million years ago.

The apex aerial predator had a 4-metre wingspan and walked on all four limbs when on land.

Fossilised pterosaur bones were found by grazier Bob Elliot on Belmont Station outside the tiny town in 2017, the first find of a pterosaur from the Winton Formation.

A two-week dig at the site uncovered the most complete specimen of its kind in Australia.

The well-preserved find includes five partial vertebrae, eight limb bones, a large part of the jaw and skull, and 40 full and partial teeth of a previously unknown pterosaur species, with the findings published in Scientific Reports today.

https://i.imgur.com/5iyeum8.jpg
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-10-04/ ... d/11571756
Rob Lister
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Rob Lister »

Witness wrote: Tue Oct 15, 2019 1:43 am Not a dinosaur (nor a bird :mrgreen: ), but here it goes:
https://i.imgur.com/5iyeum8.jpg
There sure is a lot of speculation in that line drawing but I suppose they know what they're doing.
Witness
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

Rob Lister wrote: Tue Oct 15, 2019 9:45 am There sure is a lot of speculation in that line drawing but I suppose they know what they're doing.
https://i.imgur.com/dHNpgP7.jpg

No milk, but eggs. Tough choice. :mrgreen:
Witness
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

https://i.imgur.com/Wo6uSdy.jpg
Witness
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

Pre-dinosaur, batrachians (ignore the stupid title). An interesting video about a Lagerstätte in Germany:

Witness
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

Farmer discovers new Tyrannosaur species, one of the oldest of its kind ever found

https://i.imgur.com/2CAjLu9.jpg

Tyrannosaurus rex, the king of the dinosaurs, has gained a new family member.
The fragments of a fossilized skull belonging to a previously unknown species of tyrannosaur were found in southern Alberta, Canada. And it's all thanks to John De Groot, a farmer and palaeontology enthusiast who found the fossil, according to a release from the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Alberta, where the fossils will be displayed later this year.
This is the first new tyrannosaur found in Canada in 50 years and one of the oldest tyrannosaur species found in North America. And researchers believe that Thanatotheristes degrootorum lived about 2.5 million years before its close relative, Tyrannosaurus rex.
Thanatotheristes degrootorum was stalking what is now North America as a formidable predator 79.5 million years ago. It could reach between 26 and 30 feet in length and weighed more than two tons as an adult. Tyrannosaurus rex could reach about 40 feet in length.
Its name combines Thanatos, the Greek god of death, with theristes, or "one who reaps or harvests." The second part of the name is in honor of De Groot.
https://edition.cnn.com/2020/02/10/worl ... index.html
Witness
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

Skull of Smallest Dinosaur Discovered in Amber

Researchers say it is tinier than the smallest living bird, the bee hummingbird, and raises questions about bird evolution.

https://i.imgur.com/ANylsmV.jpg
A 99-million-year old piece of amber containing the skull of a bird that measures a little more than half an inch long.
The piece of amber — about 99 million years old — is smaller than a fingertip, Dr. O’Connor and a team of researchers report on Wednesday in the journal Nature, and suspended inside of it is the skull of the smallest known bird, and, therefore, dinosaur, ever discovered. They called the bird Oculudentavis khaungraae — a name that comes from the Latin words for eye, teeth and bird. The dinosaur’s skull is only 14.25 millimeters, or a little more than half an inch, from its beak to the end of its skull. The animal had bulbous eyes that looked out from the sides of its head, rather than straight ahead like the eyes of an owl or a human.

“We were able to show that this skull is even smaller than that of a bee hummingbird, which is the smallest dinosaur of all time — also the smallest bird,” Dr. O’Connor said. “This is a tiny skull, and it’s just preserved absolutely pristinely.”

Bee hummingbirds, which are still alive today and found in Cuba, have braincases — for birds, that means the skull minus the length of the beak — that measure about 8.8 millimeters long, while the braincase of Oculudentavis is about 7.1 millimeters, or just over a quarter of an inch long. Oculudentavis also has more teeth in its mouth than any other known fossil bird, suggesting the bird was a predator that hunted other creatures.

That it sported so many teeth, though, creates confusion about the evolutionary history of dinosaurs and birds.

Most scientists now believe that birds are theropods, dinosaurs of a group that included tyrannosaurus and spinosaurus, but that birds were on their own evolutionary branch from a common ancestor. Paleontologists have long assumed that as birds evolved away from other dinosaurs, having teeth was a trait that was in the process of disappearing altogether. “But this specimen strongly shows that evolution’s really going in all different directions,” Dr. O’Connor said.

https://i.imgur.com/w82N2HN.png
A CT scan of the skull of Oculudentavis, which means eye tooth bird.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/11/scie ... amber.html
robinson
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by robinson »

Just one more "science" thing that has completely changed since I was a child. How we think of dinosaurs.
Witness
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

Not a dinosaur, but hey!

https://i.imgur.com/NIehBXD.jpg

Quetzalcoutlus northropi.
Rob Lister
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Rob Lister »

Good eats.
ed
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by ed »

Abdul Alhazred wrote: Mon Aug 05, 2019 11:41 am Dinosaur sighting not far from where I live. 8)

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... hicago.jpg

Damn dinosaurs shit all over everything. :evil:
Ha! Recognize it!!!

I can hunt you down now.

Except i won't leave fla. And i am too lazy to actually hunt you down. You'd have to come here and self immolate in some horrid way or the other.

I think you are probably safe
robinson
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by robinson »

Witness wrote: Sun Mar 15, 2020 10:28 pm
Skull of Smallest Dinosaur Discovered in Amber

Researchers say it is tinier than the smallest living bird, the bee hummingbird, and raises questions about bird evolution.

https://i.imgur.com/ANylsmV.jpg
A 99-million-year old piece of amber containing the skull of a bird that measures a little more than half an inch long.
The piece of amber — about 99 million years old — is smaller than a fingertip, Dr. O’Connor and a team of researchers report on Wednesday in the journal Nature, and suspended inside of it is the skull of the smallest known bird, and, therefore, dinosaur, ever discovered. They called the bird Oculudentavis khaungraae — a name that comes from the Latin words for eye, teeth and bird. The dinosaur’s skull is only 14.25 millimeters, or a little more than half an inch, from its beak to the end of its skull. The animal had bulbous eyes that looked out from the sides of its head, rather than straight ahead like the eyes of an owl or a human.

“We were able to show that this skull is even smaller than that of a bee hummingbird, which is the smallest dinosaur of all time — also the smallest bird,” Dr. O’Connor said. “This is a tiny skull, and it’s just preserved absolutely pristinely.”

Bee hummingbirds, which are still alive today and found in Cuba, have braincases — for birds, that means the skull minus the length of the beak — that measure about 8.8 millimeters long, while the braincase of Oculudentavis is about 7.1 millimeters, or just over a quarter of an inch long. Oculudentavis also has more teeth in its mouth than any other known fossil bird, suggesting the bird was a predator that hunted other creatures.

That it sported so many teeth, though, creates confusion about the evolutionary history of dinosaurs and birds.

Most scientists now believe that birds are theropods, dinosaurs of a group that included tyrannosaurus and spinosaurus, but that birds were on their own evolutionary branch from a common ancestor. Paleontologists have long assumed that as birds evolved away from other dinosaurs, having teeth was a trait that was in the process of disappearing altogether. “But this specimen strongly shows that evolution’s really going in all different directions,” Dr. O’Connor said.

https://i.imgur.com/w82N2HN.png
A CT scan of the skull of Oculudentavis, which means eye tooth bird.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/11/scie ... amber.html
Could it just be a baby bird?
robinson
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by robinson »

I mean dinosaur?
robinson
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by robinson »

Abdul Alhazred wrote: Tue Jul 21, 2020 12:39 pm Dr Matt figured out who I was and called me on the phone.

Not implying anything, just sayin' :)
I would talk to you on the phone
robinson
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by robinson »

Wow that is so off topic
Witness
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

Witness wrote: Sun Mar 15, 2020 10:28 pm
Skull of Smallest Dinosaur Discovered in Amber
Retracted:
Retraction Note: Hummingbird-sized dinosaur from the Cretaceous period of Myanmar

We, the authors, are retracting this Article to prevent inaccurate information from remaining in the literature. Although the description of Oculudentavis khaungraae remains accurate, a new unpublished specimen casts doubts upon our hypothesis regarding the phylogenetic position of HPG-15-3.
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2553-9

Perhaps not so much because of an erroneous phylogeny as the dubious origin of the "Burmese" amber.
Witness
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

This fossil reveals how dinosaurs peed, pooped and had sex

https://i.imgur.com/E7JGWbX.jpg

We know a lot about dinosaurs -- what they looked like, what they ate and what killed them off -- but no fossils have definitively preserved two dinosaurs in the act of mating.
However, a fossil from China of a Psittacosaurus is so well preserved that the opening the Labrador-size dinosaur used to pee, poop and reproduce is visible, allowing paleontologists to study it for the first time.
While it doesn't offer any concrete answers on how dinosaurs may have procreated, it does give some hints.
"We don't have any dinosaur fossils where you can be confident they've been caught in the act," said Jakob Vinther, a paleontologist and senior lecturer at the University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences.
What we know is "based on natural history where we compare it to living groups of animals."
While most mammals have separate holes for bodily functions, many other animals -- including birds and reptiles -- have just one and it's known as the cloaca.
The fossilized cloaca confirms that dinosaurs had one but it doesn't look like that of any other living animals.

https://i.imgur.com/zcNZnMM.jpg

"It is very unique. Most cloacas form a kind of slit. Sometimes it's a vertical split, sometimes it's a smiley face, sometimes it's a sour face. This thing has a V-shaped structure with a pair of nice flaring lips and there's not a living groups of animals that have morphology like that," Vinther said. "It is somewhat similar to crocodiles but still unique."
The study, which published in the journal Current Biology on Tuesday, said that large, pigmented lobes on either side of the opening could have harbored musky scent glands, as seen in living crocodiles and alligators.
What's more, the outer margins of the cloaca are highly pigmented with melanin. While they don't know for sure what color it was, it likely would have contrasted with the dinosaur's pale underbelly, Vinther said.
This distinctive pigmentation could mean the vent was used to display and signal, similar to living baboons and some breeding salamanders.
https://edition.cnn.com/2021/01/19/worl ... index.html
gnome
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by gnome »

I half expected this thread would be about how we've had something like ten active users for years.

:oldman:

Hey, is that a meteorite coming?
Witness
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by Witness »

Real Fossilized Mummified Edmontosaurus Dinosaur Skin

https://i.imgur.com/T8UzwB7.jpg

US $4,000.00
Sold (in 2008) on EBay.
robinson
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Re: Perpetual dinosaur thread

Post by robinson »

The dinosaurs were a lie