Wind Turbines

We are the Borg.
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Wind has surpassed hydro as most-used renewable electricity generation source in U.S.

https://i.imgur.com/2JuEf4u.png

In 2019, U.S. annual wind generation exceeded hydroelectric generation for the first time, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Electric Power Monthly. Wind is now the top renewable source of electricity generation in the country, a position previously held by hydroelectricity.

Annual wind generation totaled 300 million megawatthours (MWh) in 2019, exceeding hydroelectric generation by 26 million MWh. Wind generation has increased steadily during the past decade, in part, because the Production Tax Credit (PTC), which drove wind capacity additions, was extended. Annual hydroelectric generation has fluctuated between 250 million MWh and 320 million MWh in the past decade, reflecting a stable capacity base and variable annual precipitation.
https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=42955
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Germany hits record 61 per cent renewables for month of February

https://i.imgur.com/qM2wEsm.png
[Including irrelevant but nicely ominous picture]

Renewable energy sources provided a record 61.2% of Germany’s net public electricity generation in February, according to figures provided by the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), which also showed that wind energy provided nearly half of the country’s electricity during the month.

Fraunhofer ISE provides up to date tracking of Germany’s power sector through its Energy Charts website, and keen-eyed Twitter users highlighted record renewable figures with February now in the bag. Of the total 45.12TWh generated by Germany’s power sector, 27.63TWh, or 61.2%, was generated from renewable electricity sources.

According to at least one expert, this was a new monthly record for renewable electricity generation, smashing the previous record of 54% set in March of 2019. And while Germany has experienced higher shares of renewable electricity generation, these have been on a daily or weekly basis – such as in March of 2019 when the share of renewables in the country’s energy mix jumped to 72.4% – rather than this more impressive monthly record.

https://i.imgur.com/sOMmV6b.png

Throughout the month, Germany’s renewable energy sector regularly provided around 60% or above of the country’s electricity production – including over a dozen days around or above 70%.

Germany’s fleet of wind turbines generated a record 20.80TWh, or 45.8%, of the country’s electricity – similarly smashing the previous record of 34.7% set, again, in March of 2019. Unsurprisingly, then, wind electricity generation regularly provided around or above 60% of the country’s electricity generation.

Second in terms of contribution to Germany’s renewables power sector was biomass, which provided 3.74TWh, or 8.3% of total electricity generation, followed by solar with 1.86TWh, or 4.2%. Natural gas provided 10.2% of February’s total, while nuclear provided 11.5%. Coal provided only 17% of the country’s power in February.
https://reneweconomy.com.au/germany-hit ... ary-99434/
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

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Government set to reverse Cameron-era ban on onshore wind farm subsidies

Officials have told climate campaigners that onshore wind farms would soon be able to bid for subsidies from the Government.

The U-turn comes as ministers face increasing pressure to set out how the UK will hit its target of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050.

Land-based wind turbines have long been unpopular with grassroots Conservatives, leading the then-Prime Minister Mr Cameron to say he wanted to “rid” the countryside of the “unsightly” structures in 2015.

Onshore wind was officially blocked from bidding for financial support available to other forms of renewable energy in 2016, leading to a 94% decline in the number of new projects up to 2019.

Environmental groups have consistently protested against the ban, arguing that onshore wind is the cheapest new form of electric energy and has widespread public support.
https://www.politicshome.com/news/uk/en ... -subsidies

Have the Tories turned Green? :shock:
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

US renewables groups hail landmark clean energy bill in Virginia

Legislation lays ground for 5.2GW offshore wind ambition and big deployments of solar and storage

Virginia's General Assembly passed landmark clean energy legislation that doubles its offshore wind goal to 5.2GW and clears the way for big deployments of solar and storage, in a move hailed by US renewable energy groups as transformational.

The legislation creates a mandate requiring that 30% or more of electricity comes from renewable sources by 2030 and sets a target of 100% zero-emissions by 2050.

The bill creates a pathway for Virginia to steadily reduce its dependence on fossil fuels, partly with incentives for 16.1GW of solar PV and 2.7GW of energy storage, as well as the offshore wind goal that's behind only New York and New Jersey among US states.

Tom Kiernan, CEO of the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) called it “pro-business, forward thinking and comprehensive”, adding it will foster economic development across Virginia.
https://www.rechargenews.com/transition ... 2-1-769205
Doctor X
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Doctor X »

Wind turbines spread the Corona.

– J.D.
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Wind provided record 40.2% of Oklahoma’s statewide electricity generation in 2019

Oklahoma’s use of wind energy to generate electricity continues to increase. A record 40.2% of all state’s generated energy in 2019 was powered by renewable technology, Oklahoma Power Alliance representatives announced Tuesday during a Clean Energy Day at the state Capitol.

In 2018, Oklahoma’s wind farms generated about 36% of the energy created inside the state, up from 33% the previous year.

“This data tells a strong story” about Oklahoma’s continued leadership in renewable energy deployment, Mark Yates, vice president of the Advanced Power Alliance and its policy director in Oklahoma, said Tuesday. He noted wind’s use to generate electricity in Oklahoma during the year only was surpassed by natural gas, which generated another 46.3%.

Alliance data showed Oklahoma ranked second among U.S. states for 2019 for the amount of energy its wind farms generated, and third for the amount of wind capacity installed. The alliance estimates more than $20 billion has been invested in renewable projects within the state.

It also issued data showing the industry’s completed wind projects are ranked as a top-three taxpayer in 19 Oklahoma counties and 65 Oklahoma school districts. Projects’ owners made about $51 million in land lease payments to farmers and ranchers throughout 26 of Oklahoma’s counties in 2019. “These investments continue to transform Oklahoma’s rural economies by offering new career opportunities, circulating new income, creating sales tax revenue, and providing valuable ad valorem,” he said.
https://ieefa.org/wind-provided-record- ... n-in-2019/
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »


We are doomed! :o
Spoiler:
Some form of CGI. :mrgreen:
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

World's wind power capacity up by fifth after record year

Offshore windfarms and onshore projects in US and China fuel one of strongest years on record

The world’s wind power capacity grew by almost a fifth in 2019 after a year of record growth for offshore windfarms and a boom in onshore projects in the US and China.

The Global Wind Energy Council found that wind power capacity grew by 60.4 gigawatts, or 19%, compared with 2018, in one of the strongest years on record for the global wind power industry.

The growth was powered by a record year for offshore wind, which grew by 6.1GW to make up a tenth of new windfarm installations for the first time.

The council’s annual report found that the US and China remain the world’s largest markets for onshore wind power development. Together the two countries make up almost two-thirds of global growth in wind power.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... ecord-year
gnome
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by gnome »

Witness wrote: Fri Mar 13, 2020 12:58 am
Wind provided record 40.2% of Oklahoma’s statewide electricity generation in 2019

Oklahoma’s use of wind energy to generate electricity continues to increase. A record 40.2% of all state’s generated energy in 2019 was powered by renewable technology, Oklahoma Power Alliance representatives announced Tuesday during a Clean Energy Day at the state Capitol.

In 2018, Oklahoma’s wind farms generated about 36% of the energy created inside the state, up from 33% the previous year.

“This data tells a strong story” about Oklahoma’s continued leadership in renewable energy deployment, Mark Yates, vice president of the Advanced Power Alliance and its policy director in Oklahoma, said Tuesday. He noted wind’s use to generate electricity in Oklahoma during the year only was surpassed by natural gas, which generated another 46.3%.

Alliance data showed Oklahoma ranked second among U.S. states for 2019 for the amount of energy its wind farms generated, and third for the amount of wind capacity installed. The alliance estimates more than $20 billion has been invested in renewable projects within the state.

It also issued data showing the industry’s completed wind projects are ranked as a top-three taxpayer in 19 Oklahoma counties and 65 Oklahoma school districts. Projects’ owners made about $51 million in land lease payments to farmers and ranchers throughout 26 of Oklahoma’s counties in 2019. “These investments continue to transform Oklahoma’s rural economies by offering new career opportunities, circulating new income, creating sales tax revenue, and providing valuable ad valorem,” he said.
https://ieefa.org/wind-provided-record- ... n-in-2019/
And how many cases of Windmill Cancer?
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

gnome wrote: Fri Mar 27, 2020 11:00 am And how many cases of Windmill Cancer?
You can get your very own private cancer: 13 Best Home Wind Turbines 2020: Generate Electricity at Home.
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Offshore wind 'could hit 200GW by 2030'

Energy Industries Council report raises concerns over supply chain's ability to keep pace with demand

Offshore wind capacity could grow to as much as 200GW of operational capacity by 2030, according to a new report by the Energy Industries Council (EIC).

EIC said in the 'Global Offshore Wind 2020' report that an increased awareness of the risks and effects of climate change is likely to lead to a greater focus on decarbonisation efforts in the supply chain and means of component production.

Forecasts on the operational capacity by 2030 range from 164GW to 200GW, it added.

Other drivers of growth could be cross-sector and sector coupling, particularly around decarbonisation of offshore oil and gas platforms and the production of ‘green’ hydrogen via electrolysis using offshore wind, the report said.

The report provides an overview of the latest trends, technologies and processes across the global offshore wind sector, in addition to an in-depth look at projects and developments.

It also warned that as more projects are added to the pipeline, concerns have been raised on the supply chain’s ability to meet global demand, particularly for vessels, skilled labour and fabrication shipyards.
https://renews.biz/59270/offshore-wind- ... w-by-2030/
Surprise
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Surprise »

:dothewave:
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Wind Power Continues Its March Into The Energy Mainstream

Wind energy is becoming an increasingly important part of the energy mix around the world, as costs continue to fall and technology improves

Global economic activity is on hold at the moment, but 2019 was a boom year for wind energy, with more than 60GW of capacity installed around the world.

New figures from the Global Wind Energy Council’s (GWEC) Global Wind Energy Report show that installations were 19% higher than the year before and the second-highest ever. Total capacity is now 651GW. However, the market needs to grow even more if we are to meet our climate targets, the organization says.

China and the US dominate the global market for onshore wind projects, accounting for 60% of sales between them, while the offshore market is now 10% of the overall market, with 6.1GW installed in 2019.

2020 was expected to be a record year for the industry, with 76GW of new capacity forecast to come on line, but that figure is unlikely to be reached as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. GWEC says that it will revise its 2020-2024 forecast in the light of the potential impacts of COVID-19 on the global economy and energy markets, and will publish an updated market outlook in Q2 2020.

The key driver for the sector’s growth was the growth in the use of auctions to procure capacity, which has helped to drive down costs around the world. More than 40GW, or two thirds of new capacity, was procured through auctions, double the figure for 2018.

Most installations were in established markets, with just five countries (China, the US, the UK, India and Spain) accounting for 70% of new capacity.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/mikescott/ ... ainstream/
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Total Becomes Latest Oil Major to Enter Floating Wind Market

Building on its solar momentum, Total this week invested in a U.K. floating wind project and acquired a French wind developer.

France's Total announced two significant wind deals in recent days, becoming the latest oil company to push into floating offshore wind as it builds on its existing momentum in the solar market.

Total this week bought an 80 percent share of the 96-megawatt Erebus floating wind project in the Celtic Sea from developer Simply Blue Energy.

Then on Friday, the company confirmed its Total Quadran subsidiary had acquired developer Global Wind Power (GWP) France from its Danish parent, adding a 1-gigawatt portfolio of wind projects in France.

Fellow European oil majors Shell and BP have built-up gigawatt-scale renewables portfolios, but the pace of Total’s recent activity could see it outshine them both.

Total has 3 gigawatts of renewables within its 7-gigawatt portfolio of low-carbon projects. By 2040, the company aims to derive 15 to 20 percent of its revenue from its low-carbon business.

Earlier this year, Total bought a 50 percent share of Adani’s 2.1-gigawatt portfolio of operational solar assets in India for $510 million. In February, it signed two solar deals in Spain, including an outright acquisition of developer Solarbay’s 1.2-gigawatt development pipeline. And Total was part of the winning partnership in Qatar’s most-recent solar tender for an 800-megawatt project.
https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles ... ower-deals
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Oil Companies Are Collapsing, but Wind and Solar Energy Keep Growing

The renewable-energy business is expected to keep growing, though more slowly, in contrast to fossil fuel companies, which have been hammered by low oil and gas prices.

A few years ago, the kind of double-digit drop in oil and gas prices the world is experiencing now because of the coronavirus pandemic might have increased the use of fossil fuels and hurt renewable energy sources like wind and solar farms.

That is not happening.

In fact, renewable energy sources are set to account for nearly 21 percent of the electricity the United States uses for the first time this year, up from about 18 percent last year and 10 percent in 2010, according to one forecast published last week. And while work on some solar and wind projects has been delayed by the outbreak, industry executives and analysts expect the renewable business to continue growing in 2020 and next year even as oil, gas and coal companies struggle financially or seek bankruptcy protection.

In many parts of the world, including California and Texas, wind turbines and solar panels now produce electricity more cheaply than natural gas and coal. That has made them attractive to electric utilities and investors alike. It also helps that while oil prices have been more than halved since the pandemic forced most state governments to order people to stay home, natural gas and coal prices have not dropped nearly as much.

Even the decline in electricity use in recent weeks as businesses halted operations could help renewables, according to analysts at Raymond James & Associates. That’s because utilities, as revenue suffers, will try to get more electricity from wind and solar farms, which cost little to operate, and less from power plants fueled by fossil fuels.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/07/busi ... nergy.html
Rob Lister
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

Abdul Alhazred wrote: Tue Apr 14, 2020 1:03 am Of course there are industrial uses for petroleum other than fuel, but they will have to retrench somewhat.
The use of "petroleum" has no place in a thread about windmills. There are no petroleum power plants of note other than ones used for emergency. Refineries use it to refine, but that's because from that perspective, it's practically free.
gnome
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by gnome »

How's that? I understand coal is PRIMARILY used for power generation.
Rob Lister
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

Abdul Alhazred wrote: Tue Apr 14, 2020 4:13 pm
gnome wrote: Tue Apr 14, 2020 1:38 pm How's that? I understand coal is PRIMARILY used for power generation.
Primarily, yes.

But it's also very important in steel production.
'Tis true. Roughly half a ton of coal per ton of steel. And more to the point, only the best coal at that.

bituminous coal + oven - oxygen = coke + iron = steel
gnome
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by gnome »

My graduation hangs on the wall, but it never taught me what was real
Doctor X
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Doctor X »

Iron and coke?
Chromium steel?

– J.D.
Rob Lister
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

A stainless observation.
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

GE Renewable Energy to shut US blade factory

GE Renewable Energy is to close a blade manufacturing plant in Little Rock, Arkansas.

The company announced on Tuesday it will close the facility, which is operated by subsidiary LM Wind Power and employs around 470 people.

A company spokesperson cited declining demand for blades produced at the location as the reason for the closure. The plant makes 44 and 62-metre units.

“We understand that this is a difficult time to announce this decision and are taking a number of steps to provide additional support for our employees during this time, including continued pay for a minimum of four months,” a spokesperson said.

“We will also pay their health insurance premiums for an additional six months to ensure they have coverage through at least the end of the year."

The Little Rock site has been operational since 2007.
https://renews.biz/59679/ge-renewables- ... e-factory/

Vestas blades from Russia with love

Vestas has exported a first batch of turbine blades from a manufacturing facility in Russia.

The 48 components were shipped from the plant in Ulyanovsk, jointly set up by Russian entities Rusnano and the Ulnanotech centre, to Denmark.

Deputy Prime Minister of the Russian Federation Yuri Borisov attended an event to mark the milestone.

Borisov said: “This event is important not only for the renewable energy sector, but also for our country’s economy as a whole.

“Such projects also need to be replicated and we have supported and will continue to support the creation of high-tech industries in this area.

...

To date 435MW of wind is operational in Russia and 300MW is under construction across the country, Morozov added.
https://renews.biz/59693/vestas-blades- ... with-love/
Rob Lister
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

Can't compete, I suppose. I'm guessing they're very labor intensive.

Here's a pic of their plant and port on the Arkansas River, fwiw.

https://i.imgur.com/WjLavSl.jpg
https://www.google.com/maps/place/LM+Wi ... 92.1823455

I suppose once you get them to a waterway, it's easy to get them to any other but I'm always perplexed at the logistics of moving those things around inland.
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Wind blows by coal to become Iowa's largest source of electricity

A new report from the American Wind Energy Association says wind is now the largest single source of electricity in Iowa.

According to the trade association's Wind Powers America 2019 Annual Report, Iowa is now generating more than 10,000 megawatts of wind energy, accounting for more than 40% of the state's electricity.

Wind became the leading source of electricity in both Iowa and Kansas this year, making them the first states to reach that benchmark. Previously, coal-fired power generation had been Iowa's main source of electricity.

Projects in Iowa added the second-most wind power capacity of any state in 2019, behind only Texas.

The report also says Iowa is second in the nation in total wind industry jobs, with more than 9,000. The state's total economic investment in wind energy grew by $3 billion to reach $19 billion — also second in the nation. Texas leads both categories.

A USA Today report from earlier this year noted the reliable income from wind energy can help steady farmers dealing with a turbulent economy. The AWEA report said land lease payments for Iowa wind projects reached $69 million in 2019.

But the state's rapid investment in wind and other forms of renewable energy has prompted concern by the Iowa Farm Bureau about the loss of farmland. The organization earlier this year supported statewide regulations on where wind and solar farms can be built.

Some Iowans who live near wind farms have complained about the turbines, although researchers say there's little evidence of health impacts.
https://eu.desmoinesregister.com/story/ ... 146483002/
Rob Lister
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

Witness wrote: Sat Apr 18, 2020 2:43 am
Wind blows by coal to become Iowa's largest source of electricity

A new report from the American Wind Energy Association says wind is now the largest single source of electricity in Iowa.

According to the trade association's Wind Powers America 2019 Annual Report, Iowa is now generating more than 10,000 megawatts of wind energy, accounting for more than 40% of the state's electricity.
This is example of why technical and skeptical people need to do technical reporting. That 10,000 MWe is [almost certainly] nameplate capacity and doesn't represent actual use; actual contribution (or even availability) to the grid. And since wind is a non-distributable energy source, actual contribution is a very fuzzy number loaded with caveats and, sadly, political/marketing hype. If it did, it would represent 3 times and residential demand in that state. I suspect the real number is somewhere between 1 to 2 GWe (10 to 20% of nameplate, which is typical). One must consider the [reporting] source.
Some Iowans who live near wind farms have complained about the turbines, although researchers say there's little evidence of health impacts.
Why is the reporter conflating complaints (likely from the constant low freq noise) with health impacts? The reporter obviously doesn't have a turbine in his backyard. Some may complain they are eyesores, but I think they're pretty.

Off shore wind is much more betterestly distributable and nobody cares what a fish thinks.

Why the fuck am I up at 2:30 am debating the pros and cons of a fucking windmill?
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Rob Lister wrote: Sat Apr 18, 2020 6:38 am Why the fuck am I up at 2:30 am debating the pros and cons of a fucking windmill?
Because you're Rob Lister, duh. :wink:
Surprise
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Surprise »

Rob Lister wrote: Thu Apr 16, 2020 6:41 am Can't compete, I suppose. I'm guessing they're very labor intensive.

Here's a pic of their plant and port on the Arkansas River, fwiw.


I suppose once you get them to a waterway, it's easy to get them to any other but I'm always perplexed at the logistics of moving those things around inland.
Google has the answer.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/image/11528 ... 00x467.jpg
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

America's Renewable Energy Sources Have Produced More Electricity Than Coal Every Day for 40 Days Straight

Renewable sources including solar, wind and hydropower generated more electricity than coal-based plants every single day in April, a new report says.

Analysis shared by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEFA), based on data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), said the finding marks a major "milestone" in an energy transition that is now underway.

The move away from coal for electricity generation in the U.S. accelerated in 2020 due to lower gas prices, warmer weather and a "significant amount" of new renewable capacity being connected to the grid late last year, the report suggested.

It acknowledged that lower power demands resulting from economic slowdown sparked by the COVID-19 pandemic has also played a role in coal's decline.

Preliminary data from the EIA's Hourly Electric Grid Monitor found that utility-scale solar, wind and hydro had collectively produced more electricity than coal-based plants for roughly 40 days straight, based on statistics between March 25 and May 3.

As reported by Reuters, it shows how the ongoing novel coronavirus outbreak could speed up a shift from coal power despite attempts by the Trump administration and the U.S. energy department to boost the fossil fuel industry in recent years.
https://www.newsweek.com/america-renewa ... ys-1501967
Anaxagoras
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Anaxagoras »

Yeah, about that though.

Did you see Planet of the Humans?

Rob Lister
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

Witness wrote: Fri May 08, 2020 1:35 am
America's Renewable Energy Sources Have Produced More Electricity Than Coal Every Day for 40 Days Straight

Renewable sources including solar, wind and hydropower generated more electricity than coal-based plants every single day in April, a new report says.
...
Preliminary data from the EIA's Hourly Electric Grid Monitor found that utility-scale solar, wind and hydro had collectively produced more electricity than coal-based plants for roughly 40 days straight, based on statistics between March 25 and May 3.
Emphasis and striking mine, of course.

I refer to and renew my prior objection in this thread, i.e. neither generated nor produced equal provided; solar and wind are non-distributable. That is to say, they cannot be wholly relied upon ... except to wholly fail just when you need them most.

What's the back-up? In this case, coal. So the plants must still exist, be maintained, be manned 24/7, and be.kept.warm. REPLACE them with NG as soon as possible, yes!, but their green bragging is nothing but hot (solar) air (wind).

Harumph

I will concede that wind, rightly scaled and placed, is quite good.

It's also a bit unfair to add hydro into the mix as if it were some sort of new-age renewable. Environmentalists hate dams ... they damn them all to hell!

Hydro is indeed a renewable, but unlike wind and solar, it is a fully distributable; it is always on and practically 100% reliable and load-following to boot. It beats nuclear all to hell in every way except safety. It paved the way not just to power, but to crops, to flood prevention, and the best skateboarding ever!<--I may have made that part up.

I'm reminded of a very forward-thinking president early in the last century who remarked something to the effect of, '[A]llowing even one drop of our major waterways to reach the ocean is a damnable sin.'
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by gnome »

Rob Lister wrote: Fri May 08, 2020 8:38 am
I will concede that wind, rightly scaled and placed, is quite good.
Aha! Aha!

https://i.imgur.com/bu1zilsh.jpg
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Solar, for a change:
Biggest US solar project approved in Nevada despite critics

RENO, Nev. (AP) — The Trump administration announced final approval Monday of the largest solar energy project in the U.S. and one of the biggest in the world despite objections from conservationists who say it will destroy thousands of acres of habitat critical to the survival of the threatened Mojave desert tortoise in Nevada.

The $1 billion Gemini solar and battery storage project about 30 miles (48 kilometers) northeast of Las Vegas is expected to produce 690 megawatts of electricity — enough to power 260,000 households — and annually offset greenhouse emissions of about 83,000 cars.

It will create about 2,000 direct and indirect jobs and inject an estimated $712.5 million in the economy as the nation tries to recover from the downturn brought on by the coronavirus outbreak, Interior Secretary David Bernhardt said.

“As our economy rebounds from the invisible enemy, President Trump is working to make the United States stronger than ever before,” Bernhardt said Monday. “Our economic resurgence will rely on getting America back to work and this project delivers on that objective.”

The first phase of the project covering about 11 square miles (28 sq. km) of federal land is expected to be completed next year with 440 MW of solar capacity for use in Nevada. Another 250 MW of generating capacity would be added in the second phase with the power sold in Nevada or exported to Arizona and California in 2022.
https://news.yahoo.com/biggest-us-solar ... 26181.html
Rob Lister
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

Witness wrote: Thu May 14, 2020 1:53 am Solar, for a change:
Biggest US solar project approved in Nevada despite critics

RENO, Nev. (AP) — The Trump administration announced final approval Monday of the largest solar energy project in the U.S. and one of the biggest in the world despite objections from conservationists who say it will destroy thousands of acres of habitat critical to the survival of the threatened Mojave desert tortoise in Nevada.
https://news.yahoo.com/biggest-us-solar ... 26181.html
This is why we can't have nice things. Not that solar is a particularly nice thing, it makes pretty good sense in Nevada. They have a way of dealing with conservationists in that area.

https://i.imgur.com/5ZWuxOL.jpg
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Form Energy claims aqueous air battery provides 150 hours of storage

The holy grail of energy storage has always been low-cost and long-duration. Form Energy intends on deploying a 1 MW/150 MWh system with a Minnesota utility before 2023, an unprecedented energy storage duration if successful.

Form Energy, a secretive, long-duration energy storage startup funded by Bill Gates’ Breakthrough Energy Ventures and other investors is unstealthing — sort of.

The company has revealed that its fundamental energy storage technology is an “aqueous air battery system” that “leverages some of the safest, cheapest, most abundant materials on the planet” in order to commercially deploy a 1 MW/150 MWh long-duration storage solution.

Typical lithium ion battery storage systems provide four hours of storage compared to Form’s remarkable of 150 hours of storage. It’s not exactly the “seasonal” storage that Mateo Jaramillo, CEO of Form Energy, had spoken of in the past — but it’s a few orders of magnitude better than what can be done today.

(Although the term, “aqueous air battery system,” leaves us little more informed about the startup’s technology than when it was stealthed.)

The CEO, an energy storage veteran, has referred to the company’s product as a “bi-directional power plant” and claims that this level of duration allows for “a fundamentally new reliability function to be provided to the grid from storage, one historically only available from thermal generation resources.”

The first project

Form Energy’s first commercial project is a 1 MW, grid-connected storage system capable of delivering its rated power continuously for 150 hours with Minnesota-based utility Great River Energy.

Great River Energy is a not-for-profit wholesale electric power cooperative that provides electricity to 28 member-owner distribution cooperatives, serving 700,000 families, farms and businesses. It’s Minnesota’s second-largest electric utility.
https://www.pv-magazine.com/2020/05/08/ ... n-storage/ for the rest.

:notsure:
sparks
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by sparks »

Interesting.

1MW for 150 hours. Love to see that in person.
Rob Lister
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

I'm not sure if this is just incredibly bad reporting or Poe. I suppose they're not mutually inclusive.
Form Energy claims aqueous air battery provides 150 hours of storage
My wall clock in my office has a AA battery in it that has been powering my clock for at least 8760 hours (about a year). I guess I win.
The holy grail of energy storage has always been low-cost and long-duration. Form Energy intends on deploying a 1 MW/150 MWh system with a Minnesota utility before 2023, an unprecedented energy storage duration if successful.
1MW means it is capable of providing up to 1 megawatt of power statically. 150MWh means it can supply that maximum for 1 hour, 30 minutes.

Both are nice to know given some context, which wasn't.

I'll bet that battery will do better than 100MW static if I short the leads together. :)

Comparatively, a Tesla Model S can produce 500hp, or about 370 KW, from a battery pack rated at 100KWh. So about 15 minutes.

Witness, why do you troll me so? :x
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Rob Lister wrote: Fri May 15, 2020 12:24 am 1MW means it is capable of providing up to 1 megawatt of power statically. 150MWh means it can supply that maximum for 1 hour, 30 minutes.
The Metric System™ strikes again? :mrgreen:
Rob Lister
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

??
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

This joke (yes, Abdul, it's a joke) referred to another of Rob's posts (something about population density). :wink:
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Abdul Alhazred wrote: Fri May 15, 2020 12:56 am Damn! Do I have to read everything posted here? :evil:
No, no, gOD beware! But Rob should: viewtopic.php?p=1004761#p1004761