Wind Turbines

We are the Borg.
Rob Lister
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

It's just resting.
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

↑ That's the problem with erections… :mrgreen:




Tasmania declares itself 100 per cent powered by renewable electricity

The Tasmania government has declared that it has become the first Australian state, and one of just a handful of jurisdictions worldwide, to be powered entirely by renewable electricity.

In a statement released on Friday, Tasmanian energy minister Guy Barnett said that state had effectively become entirely self-sufficient for supplies of renewable electricity, supplied by the state’s wind and hydroelectricity projects.

“We have reached 100 per cent thanks to our commitment to realising Tasmania’s renewable energy potential through our nation-leading energy policies and making Tasmania attractive for industry investment, which in turn is creating jobs across the State, particularly in our regions,” Barnett said.

Tasmania has long had one of the greenest supplies of electricity in Australia, with the state’s significant hydroelectricity resources supplying the bulk of the state’s power. Tasmania’s history with hydroelectricity dates back to 1895, with the Duck Reach power plant in Launceston becoming the first publicly owned hydroelectric power station in the southern hemisphere.

Tasmania had been reliant on supplementary supplies of gas generation, as well as imported supplies from coal-heavy Victoria. However, with the growth of wind power in the state, Tasmania reduced its reliance on the supplementary supplies of fossil fuel electricity, and can now meet all of its needs with renewable sources.
https://reneweconomy.com.au/tasmania-de ... ity-25119/
Rob Lister
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

Witness wrote: Thu Dec 03, 2020 3:22 am
Tasmania declares itself 100 per cent powered by renewable electricity

“We have reached 100 per cent thanks to our commitment to realising Tasmania’s renewable energy potential through our nation-leading energy policies and making Tasmania attractive for industry investment, which in turn is creating jobs across the State, particularly in our regions,” Barnett said.
https://reneweconomy.com.au/tasmania-de ... ity-25119/
The downside:


Tariff Type Supply charge Usage charge
Tariff 31 Light and power 95.193 ¢/day 26.587 ¢/kWh
Tariff 41 Heating and hot water 17.750 ¢/day 17.265 ¢/kWh
Tariff 93 Time of use 105.750 ¢/day Peak: 32.137 ¢/kWh
Off-Peak: 14.963 ¢/kWh
Tariff 61 Off-peak w/afternoon boost 21.937 ¢/day 13.900 ¢/kWh
Tariff 62 Off-peak (night only) 20.969 ¢/day 13.092 ¢/kWh

https://www.canstarblue.com.au/electric ... gy-market/

The tariffs make it hard to do an apples/apples comparison but I figure my average monthly bill...

https://i.imgur.com/yVEtNtB.png
https://i.imgur.com/Eh7Tfkj.png

... would be in the neighborhood of $million/mo
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

You run a cryptominer in your basement?
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

NJ Commits to Using Offshore Wind Energy to Power More Than 3 Million Homes

New Jersey wants to be the national leader in offshore wind energy and has already taken steps including authorizing construction of a facility to build and deploy the huge turbine blades needed to operate windmills

New Jersey formally committed itself Wednesday to using offshore wind energy to power 3.2 million homes and will study the best ways to get that electricity from ocean turbines to communities where it is needed.

The state Board of Public Utilities voted to adopt the state’s plan to build a transmission system capable of handling 7500 megawatts of electricity by 2035. It will enter into an agreement with PJM Interconnection, a regional grid operator, to study the best ways to bring the power to shore and distribute it.
...
But a big question remains: how much will it cost to build, generate and deliver wind energy to utility customers? Board officials noted that those cost estimates have not yet been done and could vary depending on what methods of transmitting power are actually chosen.

Jeff Tittel, director of the New Jersey Sierra Club, said options include allowing individual wind farm projects to run their own cables to shore, or constructing a “backbone” running parallel to the coastline that numerous wind farms could plug into.
...
One potential connection spot that has been considered is the former Oyster Creek nuclear power plant in Lacey Township in Ocean County, which is already wired into the grid.
https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/n ... s/2733347/
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

https://i.imgur.com/2K92FSZ.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/EsBpjwi.jpg
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

The Danish climate minister closing down the oil industry for good

Dan Jørgensen has agreed the world’s most ambitious climate goal with a promise to cut 70% of emissions by 2030

Denmark’s climate minister is fairly certain that the deal to close down the nation’s oil industry by 2050, announced on Friday morning, marks the biggest moment in his career.

“I think this is probably going to be the biggest decision that I’m a part of in my life,” Dan Jørgensen told the Guardian hours after the announcement.

“This obviously wasn’t an easy decision. We are the biggest oil producer in the EU. We have, since the 1970s, to a large extent financed our welfare state with oil money. So to say, ‘stop’, and to pay the cost for that, is a big deal for us.”

To call it the “biggest decision” is nonetheless significant for the man who for the past year has been the public face of what many argue is the world’s most ambitious climate goal, Denmark’s plan to cut emissions by 70% by 2030.

In recent months, Jørgensen and Denmark’s prime minister have come under criticism for over-reliance on technical solutions, such as two “energy islands”, which together will generate 5GW of wind energy, and foot-dragging on issues like green tax reform.

Jørgensen said he hoped Friday’s announcement would show his government’s green promises were sincere “I think there’s an English expression ‘put your money where your mouth is’, and that is basically that’s what we’re trying to do,” he said.

He said the centre-right opposition Liberal party also deserved credit for backing the cancellation of the current exploration licensing round, something it had long opposed.

“This is an example of what has changed in Danish politics, that we now really do have a broad support for the green transformation,” he said. “Political parties that a decade ago would have never even have thought about this are now on board.”
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/ ... y-for-good
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

New Offshore Wind Turbine to Power a House for 2 Days With a Single Spin

The 13 MW turbine could produce 312 MWh in a day.

There is no denying windmills are powerful and clean sources of energy, but there's always the naysayers that will try to convince you they can't produce enough energy to efficiently power our communities. This may all soon change with the development of the Vineyard Wind project off Massachusetts.

The project's developers just recently announced that they will be using a GE (General Electric) wind turbine known as the GE Haliade-X, possibly the largest wind turbine in the world that has a capacity of 13 MW, an impressively high amount.

“The selection of GE as our preferred turbine supplier means that a historic American company will play a vital role in the development of the first commercial scale offshore wind power in the U.S.,” said in a statement Vineyard Wind CEO Lars T. Pedersen. “This is a huge moment not only for the future of our project but also for the future of an industry that is poised for exponential growth in the coming decades.”

The new 13 MW turbine could soon produce 312 MWh in a day, 8% more than the previous 12-MW GE Haliade-X generated at the port of Maasvlakte-Rotterdam in the Netherlands. This turbine already set a global record by becoming the first one to ever produce 262 MWh of power in 24 hours, enough to supply 30,000 homes in the area.
https://interestingengineering.com/new- ... ingle-spin
Anaxagoras
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Anaxagoras »

Rob Lister wrote: Tue Dec 01, 2020 12:50 pm
Witness wrote: Tue Dec 01, 2020 4:52 am
Scottish homes to be first in world to use 100% green hydrogen

Some 300 homes in Fife to be fitted with free boilers, heaters and cooking appliances
...
Ofgem’s £56m funding pot will also support a £12.7m project from National Grid to carry out “offline” hydrogen trials, using old gas grid pipes, to test the safety of transporting hydrogen gas across the country.
...
Therein lies the rub. I'm guessing those old pipes are cast iron; hydrogen embrittlement yada. Maybe they could line the old pipes with some kind of fancy pvc. I'm thinking delivery by truck would be a cheaper, if not safer, option
Does the methane in natural gas not cause hydrogen embrittlement? (Methane being a molecule with 1 carbon atom and 4 hydrogen atoms.)
Rob Lister
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

no idea
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Why the Price of New Solar Electricity Fell an Incredible 89% in the Last Decade

https://i.imgur.com/FoUABVp.png
The article: https://singularityhub.com/2020/12/13/w ... st-decade/
ceptimus
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by ceptimus »

Probably not. Water, steam, and plenty of other hydrogen-containing molecules, don't cause hydrogen embrittlement: why would methane be different? Plus I think it mainly happens at higher temperatures - which shouldn't be a problem for gas distribution pipes.
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Cut out the corporate blather.
Vestas backs wind-powered commercial-scale green ammonia plant

Power-to-X project developed by Skovgaard Invest, backed by Vestas and chemical and refining specialists Haldor Topsoe to produce ammonia for fuel and fertiliser

One of the world’s first commercial-scale green ammonia plants could be online by 2022, according to catalysts, technology, and services industries company Haldor Topsoe.

The 10MW power plant will set in Western Jutland, Denmark, and will produce more than 5,000 tonnes of green ammonia a year from renewable power, abating 8,200 tons of CO2.

The "Power-to-X" process will use 12MW of existing V80-2.0 MW Vestas wind turbines – already operating next to Haldor Topsoe's ammonia plant in Lemvig – and 50MW of new solar panels to power an electrolyser unit. This electrolyser will produce hydrogen that will subsequently be processed into ammonia.

Nitrogen – to add to the hydrogen to produce ammonia (NH3) – will be produced on site from atmospheric air using a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) type nitrogen production unit, Haldor Topsoe explained.
...
Green ammonia has been highlighted as a superior green fuel for international shipping, which currently accounts for about 2% of global energy-related CO2 emissions, Haldor Topsoe stated.

And ammonia for fertiliser, produced from fossil fuels, accounts for about 1% of global CO2 emissions.

The ammonia plant will connect to a green hydrogen solution developed by Vestas, to integrate electrolysis with wind and solar into one smart control system.
...
The site will also be connected directly to the national grid so that surplus power can be sold on.
https://www.windpowermonthly.com/articl ... onia-plant
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

News from India:
'World's Largest Renewable Energy Park' Opens in Kutch

Modi is set to virtually lay the foundation stones for the world's largest hybrid renewable energy park at Khavda and a desalination plant in Mandvi along the Arabian Sea coast.

Ahmedabad: Prime Minister Narendra Modi will be on a one-day visit to Kutch in Gujarat, on Tuesday, during which he will lay the foundations stones for several projects and interact with farmers and artisans from the tent city of Dhordo in the district.

A government release on Monday said Modi will virtually lay the foundation stones for the world’s largest hybrid renewable energy park at Khavda and a desalination plant in Mandvi along the Arabian Sea coast in the afternoon, in the presence of Chief Minister Vijay Rupani.

The 30,000 MW hybrid renewable energy park will be the world’s largest with both windmills and solar panels being set up to generate power, the release said.
https://thewire.in/politics/worlds-larg ... s-in-kutch

Photos: Rewa solar power project, one of India's largest

The Rewa solar project is a 750MW photovoltaic solar park located in the Rewa district of Madhya Pradesh.

Although partial operations of the solar project were started in July 2018, the 750MW solar park was officially inaugurated by the Prime Minister Narendra Modi on July 10, 2020.

https://i.imgur.com/HpaBuyC.png

...

The total investment on the project is estimated to be approximately $530 million. The World Bank also approved $100m under this project to cover the financing of the shared infrastructure, including access roads, water supply, telecommunications, pooling stations inside the solar parks as well as the transmission lines connecting to the external substation for the Rewa as well as the Mandsaur solar parks.
https://in.finance.yahoo.com/news/rewa- ... 21611.html
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

And news from Australia:
Bluewaters coal-fired power station written off as worthless as renewables rise
  • The Bluewaters coal-fired plant in Collie is barely ten years old
  • Its Japanese owners have written it off as worthless
  • The move is being pinned on the rise of renewable energy
The owners of Australia's newest coal-fired power station have written down the value of the asset to zero, wiping out a $1.2 billion investment in the face of an onslaught of renewable energy.

In what a financial market analyst said was a "classic example" of changes predicted in the energy industry, Japanese conglomerate Sumitomo has written off its $250 million equity stake in the Bluewaters power plant in Western Australia's south-west.

The decision was booked in Sumitomo's September accounts, in which the company acknowledged the facility was worthless despite being barely 10 years old.

It comes just nine years after Sumitomo, in a joint venture with fellow Japanese firm Kansai, bought Bluewaters for a reported $1.2 billion from the wreckage of fallen coal tycoon Ric Stowe's failed business empire.

Kansai is believed to have made similar accounting changes, meaning both companies have reduced their equity stakes to zero.

The development also coincides with growing challenges for the power station near Collie, south of Perth, where it produces up to 15 per cent of the energy used in the state's biggest grid.

Earlier this year, a syndicate of Australian and overseas banks including Westpac and ANZ apparently refused to refinance $370 million in debt owed by Bluewaters amid concerns about the facility's coal supply security and investing in the fossil fuel.

Instead, the banks sold their debt stakes at a discount to distressed debt specialists — so-called vulture funds — including Oaktree Capital and Elliot Management.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-12-17/ ... s/12990532
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Windfarms in Great Britain break record for clean power generation

Forty per cent of Friday’s electricity was generated in windfarms thanks to blustery winter weather

Blustery winter weather helped Great Britain’s windfarms set a record for clean power generation, which made up more than 40% of its electricity on Friday.

Wind turbines generated 17.3GW on Friday afternoon, according to figures from the electricity system operator, narrowly beating the previous record set in early January this year.

High wind speeds across the country helped wind power’s share of the electricity mix remain above 40% through Saturday. Coal and gas plants made up less than a fifth of electricity generated.

Melanie Onn, the deputy chief executive of Renewable UK, said: “It’s great to see our onshore and offshore windfarms have smashed another record, generating more power on a cold December day than ever before, just when we need it most.”

The record follows the “greenest” year ever for the electricity system thanks to a surge in renewable energy and sharp drop in energy demand caused by the shutdown of office blocks, restaurants and schools during coronavirus restrictions.

Solar power reached a record of 9.6GW in April, which helped spur the longest coal-free streak ever, of 1,629 consecutive hours, which ended in June.

Wind power generation reached a record share of almost 60% of electricity use in August as demand for power fell by more than a fifth compared with the year before.
https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... generation

Multiple records? :notsure:
Rob Lister
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

Witness wrote: Sun Dec 20, 2020 2:38 am
Wind power generation reached a record share of almost 60% of electricity use in August asdemand for powerfell by more than a fifth compared with the year before.
There's the story that needs reporting.
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Geothermal energy, the forgotten renewable, has finally arrived

Czapla is in charge of a 7,380-acre plot owned by Controlled Thermal Resources (CTR). It’s a barren scrap of desert that ends abruptly in the great saline sea east of San Diego. For a geothermal engineer, it’s paradise.

Two kilometers below the surface lies a mineral-rich cauldron of hot water where temperatures can exceed 390°C. As the Salton Sea recedes, opportunities to turn that into energy and profits are emerging. If California approves its permit, CTR will start operating its Hell’s Kitchen Lithium and Power project in 2023, one of the first new US geothermal power plants in almost a decade.

And it almost certainly will not be the last. Although the shores of the Salton Sea already hosts 10 geothermal plants—most of them built in the 1980s—geology, politics, and energy demand have aligned to make Hell’s Kitchen, and projects like it, a hot investment once again.

Over the last decade, California has poured billions of dollars into its renewable energy goals. It has scaled up wind and solar power beyond expectation, while virtually ignoring geothermal plants despite possessing the most productive geothermal fields in the US. Today, wind and solar provide more than 86% of California’s renewable capacity, while geothermal sources provide virtually the same amount as two decades ago.

But in a climate constrained world, geothermal, the “forgotten renewable,” is getting a second chance.

https://i.imgur.com/EThcVW9.png
https://qz.com/1947017/geothermal-is-th ... te-change/ for the rest.
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

https://i.imgur.com/aCgEYL4.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/IwpoZ1O.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/1NQbFEm.jpg

67 m blade. Better avoid windy conditions, ha ha!
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Various vintage windy efforts:

https://i.imgur.com/9zHy0Is.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/rJ05woU.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/qRVuTQw.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/qegIcY9.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/BwgFcTS.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/AgZVWCa.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/0mtZExI.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/j8vD6qW.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/byylMFa.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/3triOnP.jpg

:mrgreen:
xouper
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by xouper »

Speaking of landsailing . . .
  • Freaky Speeder Rides the Wind to World Record
    by Tony Borroz, March 27, 2009
    https://www.wired.com/2009/03/british-man-set/
Jenkins managed to hit 126.1 mph with winds clocked at just 30 mph.
https://www.wired.com/images_blogs/auto ... npah01.jpg

If anyone has broken that speed record since 2009, then someone please update wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_sailing

Also, Wikipedia says the winds were 30-50 mph, which seems reasonable to me, but doesn't cite a source for that.
xouper
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by xouper »

I recall watching a video (a few years ago) of an airplane taking off using only a sail to generate forward motion.

Obviously not possible.

But I cannot find it at the moment. Maybe someone else knows where that video is.

The video itself seems real, but clearly the flying part is fake, which is evident from the almost invisible cable that is being used to pull the airplane forward through the air.
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

An old vid of that record:

ceptimus
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by ceptimus »

The blackbird was another interesting wind-driven land vehicle. It "sailed" directly into the wind, or directly downwind, using only wind power. It could go two to three times the windspeed in both directions. It performed the trick by using a wind turbine coupled to the wheels - the turbine could power the wheels, or the wheels could power the turbine.

It's puzzling to consider how it managed to accelerate above the windspeed when going downwind. At the point where it exactly matches the windspeed, the airflow speed relative to the car is zero - so what drives the turbine, allowing it to continue to accelerate? It seems like a perpetual motion machine at first, but it really did work. The answer is that the wheels drove the turbine.

Using that technique, it's theoretically possible to get a plane to take off powered by the wind - though as soon as it left the ground it would no longer be driven forward, so its speed would decay and it would quickly glide back down.
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Applied to ships (very few documents on the Web):



Video is a bit lame, sorry for that.
Rob Lister
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

For those not in the know, Rick Harrison is one of the star of the reality show Pawn Stars, which is worthy, imo.

Pawn Stars is in its 16th season. Rumors are he has a net worth of [only] 9 million. Why [only]? He's probably made the History Channel at least 100 million.

Anyway, in this video he talks about his off-grid systems, in particular, batteries headaches.

Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Solar and wind to dominate 40GW US power plant build in 2021: EIA

Federal agency sees renewables technologies accounting for 70% of new plant, led by installations in Texas, Nevada, California and North Carolina

Solar and wind will account for 70% of the nearly 40GW of new large-scale US electricity generating capacity that developers plan to bring into commercial operation in 2021, according to a preliminary estimate by the federal Energy Information Administration (EIA).

More than half of planned PV additions are in four states: Texas (28%), Nevada (9%), California (9%) and North Carolina (7%), with new PV installations expected to total almost 15.5GW, or 39% of capacity additions, 12.2GW wind (31%); natural gas 6.6GW (16%); utility-scale battery storage, 4.3GW (11%); nuclear 1.1GW (3%), and other 0.2GW (0.1%).

Some of the build-out in Texas reflects investors’ belief that electricity demand will rebound as the Canada-size economy there recovers from the Covid-19 pandemic, while former pacesetter coal will continue losing market share to cleaner alternatives.

Texas and Oklahoma will account for more than half of 2021 wind capacity additions, according to EIA, the statistics arm of the US Department of Energy.

With more than 30GW installed, Texas remains the largest wind market in the western hemisphere. In neighbouring Oklahoma, the 999MW Traverse project sponsored by a unit of utility holding company American Electric power will be the nation’s largest wind farm installation this year.

Texas, Ohio and Pennsylvania will build more than 70% of planned natural gas capacity this year including 3.9GW of combined-cycle generators and 2.6GW of combustion-turbine generators.

Utility-scale battery-storage installations will more than quadruple this year as systems are increasingly paired with fast-growing renewables. The world’s largest solar-powered battery (409MW) is under construction by utility Florida Power & Light at the Manatee Solar energy Center in Florida and is scheduled to be operational in late 2021.

Last month, Congress extended federal tax credits for both solar (two years) and onshore wind (one year), while enabling offshore wind projects to claim the investment tax credit at 30% that began construction after 1 January 2017 as well as those that will do so through 2025.
https://www.rechargenews.com/wind/solar ... 2-1-943432
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Electric car batteries with five-minute charging times produced

Exclusive: first factory production means recharging could soon be as fast as filling up petrol or diesel vehicles

Batteries capable of fully charging in five minutes have been produced in a factory for the first time, marking a significant step towards electric cars becoming as fast to charge as filling up petrol or diesel vehicles.

Electric vehicles are a vital part of action to tackle the climate crisis but running out of charge during a journey is a worry for drivers. The new lithium-ion batteries were developed by the Israeli company StoreDot and manufactured by Eve Energy in China on standard production lines.

StoreDot has already demonstrated its “extreme fast-charging” battery in phones, drones and scooters and the 1,000 batteries it has now produced are to showcase its technology to carmakers and other companies. Daimler, BP, Samsung and TDK have all invested in StoreDot, which has raised $130m to date and was named a Bloomberg New Energy Finance Pioneer in 2020.

The batteries can be fully charged in five minutes but this would require much higher-powered chargers than used today. Using available charging infrastructure, StoreDot is aiming to deliver 100 miles of charge to a car battery in five minutes in 2025.

“The number one barrier to the adoption of electric vehicles is no longer cost, it is range anxiety,” said Doron Myersdorf, CEO of StoreDot. “You’re either afraid that you’re going to get stuck on the highway or you’re going to need to sit in a charging station for two hours. But if the experience of the driver is exactly like fuelling [a petrol car], this whole anxiety goes away.”

“A five-minute charging lithium-ion battery was considered to be impossible,” he said. “But we are not releasing a lab prototype, we are releasing engineering samples from a mass production line. This demonstrates it is feasible and it’s commercially ready.”

Existing Li-ion batteries use graphite as one electrode, into which the lithium ions are pushed to store charge. But when these are rapidly charged, the ions get congested and can turn into metal and short circuit the battery.

The StoreDot battery replaces graphite with semiconductor nanoparticles into which ions can pass more quickly and easily. These nanoparticles are currently based on germanium, which is water soluble and easier to handle in manufacturing. But StoreDot’s plan is to use silicon, which is much cheaper, and it expects these prototypes later this year. Myersdorf said the cost would be the same as existing Li-ion batteries.

“The bottleneck to extra-fast charging is no longer the battery,” he said. Now the charging stations and grids that supply them need to be upgraded, he said, which is why they are working with BP. “BP has 18,200 forecourts and they understand that, 10 years from now, all these stations will be obsolete, if they don’t repurpose them for charging – batteries are the new oil.”
https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... ging-times

Let's hope it is not waporvare.
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Renewables overtook fossil fuels in EU electricity mix in 2020: Report

Renewables overtook fossil fuels as the European Union’s main source of electricity for the first time in 2020 as new projects came online and coal-power shrank, a report showed on Monday.

Renewable sources such as wind and solar generated 38% percent of the 27-member state bloc’s electricity in 2020, with fossil fuels such as coal and gas contributing 37%, the report by think tanks Ember and Agora Energiewende showed.

https://i.imgur.com/12cN2FB.png

Denmark achieved the highest proportion of wind and solar power, which contributed 61% of its electricity needs in 2020. Ireland achieved 35% and Germany 33%.

Countries with the lowest share of renewables, below 5%, were Slovakia and the Czech Republic, the data showed.

Curbs on homes and business designed to limit the spread of the novel coronavirus led to a 4% drop in overall electricity demand in the EU last year, but the impact was felt more keenly by fossil fuel producers, the report showed.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-eu-r ... SKBN29T0T8
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Solar power now cheapest way to add electricity in many markets - and getting cheaper

Solar’s advantage continues to grow - even without subsidies or environmental initiatives

The cost of solar power has dropped 90% over the last two decades, and will likely fall another 15% to 25% in the decade to come, says Wood Mackenzie. By 2030, solar will become the cheapest source of new power in every US state, plus Canada, China, and 14 other nations.

Wood Mackenzie’s latest report Total eclipse: How falling costs will secure solar’s dominance in power calls the solar power industry “highly investible” due to its growing ability to meet both economic and policy goals.

Wood Mackenzie research director Ravi Manghani said: “As the world strives to recover from the economic slump caused by the Covid-19 pandemic and simultaneously meet the climate and environmental goals of the Paris Agreement, solar is uniquely placed to advance efforts towards a low-carbon, sustainable future.”

Solar is already the cheapest form of new electricity generation in 16 US states, plus Spain, Italy and India. Even with the Covid-19 pandemic raging, global installations exceeded 115 gigawatts (GW) in 2020, compared to 1.5 GW in 2006.

While the growth of solar to this scale was driven partially by government subsidies and environmental goals, solar generation is now attractive based on price alone.

“Solar is becoming so competitive that not only is it a means of decarbonisation for corporate buyers, but also a way to lower the cost of energy for their businesses,” Manghani added.

In the next decade, Wood Mackenzie expects more cost reduction to be driven by growth and development in several technologies:
  • Bifacial panels. New solar cell technology allows both sides of a panel to generate power – as much as 15% more.
  • Larger solar modules. This allows more of each panel’s surface area to generate power, leading to big gains in output.
  • Trackers. More solar installations include motorised systems that track the sun’s movement and change the alignment of the panels to increase energy capture.
Wood Mackenzie stresses that its outlook only factored in technological improvements that are already well into the commercial development pipeline. The projections do not assume any breakthroughs in next-generation solar technology or other innovations, which could provide further upside to the outlook.
https://www.woodmac.com/press-releases/ ... g-cheaper/
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

BP's oil exploration team swept aside in climate revolution

Nothing escapes the winds of change now sweeping through BP, not even the exploration team that for more than a century powered its profits by discovering billions of barrels of oil.

Its geologists, engineers and scientists have been cut to less than 100 from a peak of more than 700 a few years ago, company sources told Reuters, part of a climate change-driven overhaul triggered last year by CEO Bernard Looney.

“The winds have turned very chilly in the exploration team since Looney’s arrival. This is happening incredibly fast,” a senior member of the team told Reuters.

Hundreds have left the oil exploration team in recent months, either transferred to help develop new low-carbon activities or laid off, current and former employees said.

The exodus is the starkest sign yet from inside the company of its rapid shift away from oil and gas, which will nevertheless be its main source of cash to finance a switch to renewables for at least the next decade.

BP declined to comment on the staffing changes, which have not been publicly disclosed.

Reuters spoke to a dozen former and current employees of BP who highlighted the massive challenges the company faces in its transition from fossil fuels to carbon neutrality.

Looney made his intentions clear internally and externally by lowering BP’s production targets and becoming the first oil major CEO to promote this as a positive to investors seeking a long-term vision for a lower-carbon economy.

BP is cutting some 10,000 jobs, around 15% of its workforce, under Looney’s restructuring, the most aggressive among Europe’s oil giants including Royal Dutch Shell and Total.

The 50-year-old, a veteran oil engineer who previously headed the oil and gas exploration and production division, aims to cut output by 1 million barrels per day, or 40%, over the next decade while growing renewable energy output 20 fold.

Despite the changes, oil and gas will remain BP’s main source of revenue until at least 2030.
https://www.reuters.com/article/idUSKBN29U00C?il=0
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

South Korea unveils $43 billion plan for world's largest offshore wind farm

SEOUL (Reuters) - South Korea unveiled a 48.5 trillion won ($43.2 billion) plan to build the world’s largest wind power plant by 2030 as part of efforts to foster an environmentally-friendly recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.

The project is a major component of President Moon Jae-in’s Green New Deal, initiated last year to curb reliance on fossil fuels in Asia’s fourth-largest economy and make it carbon neutral by 2050.

Moon attended a signing ceremony in the southwestern coastal town of Sinan for the plant, which will have a maximum capacity of 8.2 gigawatts.

“With this project, we are accelerating the eco-friendly energy transition and moving more vigorously toward carbon neutrality,” Moon said at the event.

Utility and engineering companies also attended, including Korea Electric Power Corp, SK E&S, Hanwha Engineering & Construction Corp, Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction Co., CS Wind Corp and Samkang M&T Co.

The companies will provide 47.6 trillion of the required funding and the government the remaining 0.9 trillion, Moon’s office Blue House said.

It said the project would provide up to 5,600 jobs and help achieve a goal to boost the country’s wind power capacity to 16.5 GW by 2030 from 1.67 GW now.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-sout ... SKBN2A512D
gnome
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Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2004 12:40 am
Location: New Port Richey, FL

Re: Wind Turbines

Post by gnome »

I had a guy from "Sunrun" approach me about setting up solar panels on my home. Since we're selling in the next year or so, the usual option of buying panels didn't seem feasible. The salesman offered a different option: leasing. In this case their company would install and own the panels--we would pay them a monthly fee, and theoretically lose enough off of our electric bill to cover the difference and then some. We'd also pocket any zero metering credits from the power company if what we generated outpaced our usage.

It sounded like an idea that could work, but I've taken to automatically mistrusting anyone who shows up to my door, and did some research. I found out three important things:

- Leased solar panels seem to be the least cost/benefit effective for a homeowner compared to other options.
- Having to transfer the active lease greatly complicates the sale of a house, rather than making the sale more attractive by "adding value" as the salesman claimed.
- The sunrun company had terrible online reviews, from bad customer service experiences to finding the monthly bill between the power company and the lease to actually increase rather than decrease.

So needless to say I told the salesman I was not interested and said exactly why, including the bad reviews. He personally was a pretty good salesperson--maybe he'll find work with a better company.
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

U.S. Wind, Solar Post Record Growth in 2020 Despite Pandemic Restrictions, Job Losses

United States solar and wind developers had a record year in 2020 despite punishing restrictions and job losses brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, ultimately rising to 20% of the country’s electricity production, according to new data released last week by Bloomberg New Energy Finance and the Business Council for Sustainable Energy.

The growth in the two renewables brought the electricity sources usually designated as zero-carbon, including hydropower and nuclear, up to 40% of U.S. electricity supply, Greentech Media reports. Coal-fired generation continued its fall, while fossil gas demand declined for the first time since 2009.

“It was a year of records but also resilience,” said Ethan Zindler, BloombergNEF’s head of Americas research. “I’ll be candid in saying about half-way through the year, things looked pretty dire.”

The first months of the pandemic were a tough time for the renewables, Greentech recalls, with manufacturers in Asia pausing production and U.S. shutdown orders putting a major crimp in construction and sales. Environmental Entrepreneurs said the industry last 67,000 jobs between February and December.

But “in the end, those struggles did not mute overall growth,” Greentech writes. BloombergNEF put new solar installations for the year at 16.5 gigawatts, well ahead of the 2019 record of 14.4 GW, while Wood Mackenzie calculated the 2020 figure at more than 19 GW. Wind added 17 gigawatts.

Gas-fired generation still made up 41% of the electricity mix, showing “how difficult it will be to erode the grip that fossil fuels have on the power industry, as President Biden has pledged to do,” Greentech says. “Though scientists recognize the need to make deep and immediate cuts to emissions, companies whose bottom lines are defined in part by selling natural gas continue to frame gas and renewables as complementary resources.”

“If you love renewables, you have to at least like natural gas,” said Lisa Alexander, senior vice president of corporate affairs and chief sustainability officer at gas wholesaler Sempra Energy. “We don’t see it as oppositional. We see it as both systems working in tandem to decarbonize.”

After the significant role gas played in the first phase of grid decarbonization, with its accent on shutting down coal plants, BloombergNEF’s Zindler told Greentech it’s “an open question” how quickly those same utilities will abandon coal for clean renewables. “I think it’s going to be one of the great, interesting challenges of the next four years and beyond,” he said.
https://theenergymix.com/2021/02/24/u-s ... ob-losses/
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

U.S. readies $40 billion in loans to boost clean energy - official

U.S. Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm said on Wednesday she is ready to reactivate her department’s loan program office that went mostly unused in the last four years and has more than $40 billion in funds to boost the transition to clean energy.

“I am ready to rev those engines back up so that we can spur the next generation of innovation and deployment,” Granholm said during the virtually-held CERAWeek conference. She did not offer details on when the loans would be offered.

Granholm said Jigar Shah, an expert in clean energy finance, will head the department’s loan programs office. Shah was most recently co-founder and president of Generate Capital, were he helped entrepreneurs speed decarbonization. He also founded SunEdison, a solar energy financing company.

“He’s going to help us put together an indomitable portfolio of investments for American taxpayers, that will help us tackle climate change and create jobs,” said Granholm, who was confirmed by the Senate last week, with support from several Republicans from fossil fuel producing states.

“We’re ready to invest in advanced vehicles, carbon capture, advanced reactors, and so much more,” said Granholm, a former governor of Michigan, who secured federal funding for companies in the state to make electric cars and batteries. She will likely play a big role in President Joe Biden’s push to put the country on a path to fully decarbonize the economy by 2050.
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-cera ... KKBN2AV1YS
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

U.S. solar industry comes ‘roaring back,’ breaks multiple records in 2020

Despite all the challenges of 2020, the U.S. solar industry broke several records.

The U.S. Solar Market Insight 2020 Year-in-Review report, released by the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) and Wood Mackenzie, found that the industry installed a record 19.2 GW of capacity last year. That was a 43% increase from 2019 and bested the market’s previous annual record of 15.1 GW set in 2016.

California, Texas, and Florida were the top three states for annual solar capacity additions for the second straight year. In 2020, 27 states installed over 100 MW of new solar capacity, a record.

Annual residential solar deployment rose 11% from 2019, reaching a record 3.1 GW. However, the report said this was lower than the 18% annual growth in 2019, as residential installations were impacted by the pandemic in the first half of 2020.

Annual non-residential installations fell 4% from 2019, with 2 GW installed in 2020. The report said the pandemic impacted this segment, too, through delayed project interconnections and prolonged development timelines.

For the second year in a row, solar led all technologies in new U.S. electric-generating capacity added, accounting for 43% in 2020.

https://i.imgur.com/lZt0j3E.png
https://pv-magazine-usa.com/2021/03/16/ ... s-in-2020/
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Promotional CGI, complete with uplifting music ( :mrgreen: ):

Rob Lister
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Joined: Sun Jul 18, 2004 7:15 pm
Title: Incipient toppler
Location: Swimming in Lake Ed

Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Rob Lister »

[Grumbling Acceptance but I believe a net loss]
gnome
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Joined: Tue Jun 29, 2004 12:40 am
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by gnome »

Something I think might actually go over well here:

Ars Technica: Nuclear should be considered part of clean energy standard, White House says
Witness
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Re: Wind Turbines

Post by Witness »

Biden’s new moonshot: An offshore wind industry to rival Europe’s

Having fallen a decade behind in developing the renewable energy, the U.S. is priming itself for a space race-style comeback.

...

Today, Europe has 5,400 turbines rising from the ocean with a capacity of 25 gigawatts, of energy – enough to power more than 8 million homes. As the global manufacturing hub for the offshore wind industry, the European Union said in 2019 that the sector accounted for 210,000 jobs across its 27 member nations and the United Kingdom.

Both the E.U. and U.K. – which left the E.U. last year — are planning for far more offshore wind power. Tracking with ever more aggressive greenhouse gas reduction targets, the E.U. wants to reach 60 GW by 2030 and 300 GW by 2050. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson pledged last year in a speech that the U.K. would install enough turbines over the next decade to power all of its 30 million homes: “Your kettle, your washing machine, your cooker, your heating, your plug-in electric vehicle — the whole lot of them will get their juice cleanly and without guilt from the breezes that blow around these islands.”

Prior to the 2020 election, most observers believed that a President Biden would put the U.S. offshore wind industry back on the launching pad in some form. And he has – with ambitious targets that rival the boldness John F. Kennedy offered in his speech about putting a man on the moon (which came while the Russians were way ahead in the manned-spaceflight race). “To be sure, we are behind, and will be behind for some time in manned flight,” President Kennedy said in 1962. “But we do not intend to stay behind, and in this decade, we shall make up and move ahead.”

In late-March, the Biden administration announced a national goal of 30 GW of offshore wind energy by 2030 – which could power over 10 million homes. That would give the U.S. the same capacity of offshore power over the next 9 years that it took Europe 30 years to build. While Biden is unlikely to deliver a speech on offshore wind to rival JFK’s moon speech, there is no doubt that we suddenly have a White House possessed with a futuristic vision akin to what I saw on that 2013 trip to Anholt.
https://grist.org/energy/bidens-new-moo ... l-europes/

We'll see.