Coins

What's your artifact doing in Boss Kean's ditch?
Witness
Posts: 35689
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:50 pm

Coins

Post by Witness »

Leaving the thread open for future finds…



An ultra-rare coin celebrating Julius Caesar's assassination sells for a record $3.5 million

https://i.imgur.com/sKpnOkc.jpg

An ancient gold coin described as a "naked and shameless celebration" of the assassination of Julius Caesar, featuring a portrait of one of the men who killed him, has set a new record for a coin sold at auction.
Bought by an anonymous bidder for £2.7 million ($3.5 million), the "aureus" coin features a portrait of Marcus Junius Brutus -- one of the ringleaders in the assassination of Caesar in 44 BC.

It also depicts the daggers used by Brutus and his co-conspirator Cassius to slay the ancient general in the Theater of Pompey in Rome, and a cap of Liberty -- a symbolic garment given to slaves upon their freedom.
It is inscribed with the phrase "Eid Mar" -- the Ides of March -- a reference to March 15, the date of Caesar's death.
The coin was issued by Brutus two years after the assassination, in 42 BC.
"In an act of unparalleled braggadocio, we are at once presented with the murder weapons used to slay Caesar, the precise date of the deed, and the motive," Richard Beale, managing director of Roma Numismatics, the London auction house that sold the coin, wrote in a press release, describing the aureus as a "naked and shameless celebration" of the assassination.
Caesar's death is said to have been fueled by the belief among Roman politicians that he intended to make himself king.
Having been appointed "dictator perpetuo" -- dictator for life -- just two months earlier, Caesar was killed by a group of senators, including friends and people whom he had previously pardoned.
https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/j ... index.html
Fid
Posts: 1601
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2004 3:45 pm
Location: The island of Atlanta

Re: Coins

Post by Fid »

"...Killed by senators..."
Heh...if only...
Anaxagoras
Posts: 29660
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2008 5:45 am
Location: Yokohama/Tokyo, Japan

Re: Coins

Post by Anaxagoras »

I wonder how they know it's genuine. If true, I can understand that it would be worth a lot.
Witness
Posts: 35689
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:50 pm

Re: Coins

Post by Witness »

Fid wrote: Sun Nov 01, 2020 10:08 pm "...Killed by senators..."
Heh...if only...
:figamagee:
Witness
Posts: 35689
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:50 pm

Re: Coins

Post by Witness »

Anaxagoras wrote: Mon Nov 02, 2020 1:16 am I wonder how they know it's genuine. If true, I can understand that it would be worth a lot.
Some details here (a quite interesting article): Roman coin authenticated in Sarasota area sets world record at auction
Although some 100 silver EID MAR coins have been recovered, the sample analyzed by NGC is one of only three gold versions known to exist. One is owned by Deutsche Bundesbank, and the other is on loan from a private collector to the British Museum.


https://i.imgur.com/xTZycNZ.jpg
About this ("uncirculated") silver version: One of finest known Eid Mar silver denarius in Goldberg sale
Witness
Posts: 35689
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:50 pm

Re: Coins

Post by Witness »

Witness
Posts: 35689
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:50 pm

Re: Coins

Post by Witness »

From a year ago:
A ‘Mind-Blowing’ $6 Million Coin Hoard Discovered by Treasure Hunters Will Be Unveiled at the British Museum

https://i.imgur.com/TZum8YV.jpg

A pair of metal detectorists made the discovery of a lifetime when they unearthed a hoard of ancient coins worth around $6 million in a field in Somerset, in the West of England. The historic find, believed to be one of the biggest ever treasure troves uncovered in the UK, is due to be unveiled at the British Museum tomorrow.

Treasure hunters Adam Staples and Lisa Grace unearthed the 2,571 Anglo-Saxon and Norman coins in January when they were searching farmland with their trusty metal detectors.

...

A coin expert at the London auctioneers Dix Noonan Webb has valued the coins at around £5 million ($6 million). They include mint-condition silver King Harold II pennies, coins from the reign of William the Conqueror, which could be worth as much as £5,000 ($6,000) each, as well as pieces minted by previously-unknown moneyers.

The King Harold II coins are particularly rare due to his short reign. The last Anglo-Saxon king was on the throne for just nine months before he died during the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The expert said that the hoard may prove too pricey for museums, which might have to launch an appeal for sponsors to raise funds to acquire them.

The coins would have belonged to a wealthy person who probably buried them for safekeeping at some point after the Norman Invasion of 1066 and probably before 1072.

The biggest collection of buried treasure ever discovered in the UK was the Staffordshire Hoard of Anglo-Saxon gold and silver metalwork, but this latest find could worth $1 million more, and have as great or even more historic value.

https://i.imgur.com/5kAU4To.jpg
William the Conqueror (left) and Harold II coins. Photo by Pippa Pearce. Copyright the Trustees of the British Museum.
https://news.artnet.com/art-world/briti ... ns-1636096
Witness
Posts: 35689
Joined: Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:50 pm

Re: Coins

Post by Witness »

Arabian coins found in US may unlock 17th-century pirate mystery

Discovery may explain escape of Capt Henry Every after murderous raid on Indian emperor’s ship

https://i.imgur.com/P6J5gPZ.jpg

A handful of coins unearthed from a pick-your-own-fruit orchard in the US state of Rhode Island and other random corners of New England may help solve a centuries-old cold case.

The villain in this tale: a murderous English pirate who became the world’s most-wanted criminal after plundering a ship carrying Muslim pilgrims home to India from Mecca, then eluded capture by posing as a slave trader.

Jim Bailey, an amateur historian and metal detectorist, found the first intact 17th-century Arabian coin in a meadow in Middletown.

That ancient pocket change – the oldest ever found in North America – could explain how pirate Capt Henry Every vanished.

On 7 September 1695, the pirate ship Fancy, commanded by Every, ambushed and captured the Ganj-i-Sawai, a royal vessel owned by the Indian emperor Aurangzeb, then one of the world’s most powerful men. Onboard were not only the worshippers returning from their pilgrimage but tens of millions of dollars’ worth of gold and silver.

What followed was one of the most lucrative and heinous robberies of all time. Historical accounts say Every’s band tortured and killed the men onboard the Indian ship and raped the women before escaping to the Bahamas.

Word of their crimes spread quickly, and King William III of England – under enormous pressure from a scandalised India and the East India Company trading giant – put a large bounty on their heads. “Everybody was looking for these guys,” said Bailey.

Until now, historians knew only that Every eventually sailed to Ireland in 1696, where the trail went cold. But Bailey says the coins he and others have found are evidence that the notorious pirate first made his way to the American colonies, where he and his crew used the plunder for day-to-day expenses while on the run.
https://www.theguardian.com/science/202 ... te-mystery for the rest.